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It’s here, it’s queer, get used to it.  99 cents on Amazon HERE until 11:59pm eastern time U.S. on Friday 2/15.  Then $9.99.  As always, it’s included in the 180 Platinum Collection, which will include audio versions of this book (read by yours truly) and Eat for Heat by the end of the month.

It’s also included in the brand-spankin’ new Metabolism Bundle.

Read it, review it, eat the food and don’t spew it.

No really, the reviews are a big help and I anticipate this one rocketing up to #1 in all of diets and weight loss on Amazon this week.  If you want some hungry, cold, barely-fertile, food-obsessed dieter out there to hear the basic message of this book and 180DegreeHealth, your chance to reach them is in a heartfelt review.

Plus, it will just be fun to see this thing sitting atop all the other weight loss crap currently for sale on the planet, if only for a brief moment.  It’s not likely to happen without some great reviews.  Even just a couple sentences is a big help.

Let all your dieting friends know about the 99-cent window of opportunity too.  This one is really meant for your average person, with no obscure internet health nerd references.  100% butyric acid and Kitavan-free.  Enjoy everyone!  BUY ON AMAZON

PS- No Kindle required. Free Cloud Reader here.

So far so good… Screenshot from 11:24pm eastern time 2/13/2013

Excerpt…

 “It’s extremely hard to figure out whether or not something is good or bad for you based on purely intellectual reasoning.  Think coffee is bad for you?  Well, there is a lot of good information about coffee being healthy.  There is a lot of information and justification for it being unhealthy.  I’ve been studying health and nutrition intensely for a decade, and you know what, I’m not sure if coffee is healthy or not.  Or sugar.  Or alcohol.  Or chocolate.  Or grains.  Or legumes.  Or meat.  Or probiotics.  Or vegetables.  Or fruit.  Or dairy.

I used to be able to give a definitive answer on each one of those things, but now I can’t. I simply know too much to be sure, as there are numerous justifications for or against each one of the things I just listed.  If you are sure about one of the above-listed things, that’s because you’ve ingested one set of information and haven’t investigated the other side of the story.  If you had, you would be equally as unsure as I am.

And even with things that we can all intellectually agree is unhealthy, such as a meal at McDonald’s, there will be literally thousands of people that read this book who are freezing cold, or haven’t slept through the night in years, or who are suffering from anxiety, yada yada.  And most of those health-conscious people wouldn’t DARE eat at McDonald’s.  But, to their surprise, they might find almost immediate relief from their health condition(s) if they were to go pig out on 2-3 double Cheeseburgers, an apple pie or two, and an ice cold Coke from none other than the infamous Mickey D’s.  Why?  Because the calorie-density, digestibility, and salt and sugar-heavy load of a McDonald’s meal is unparalleled.  And for someone in a really low metabolic state, this can literally be the most therapeutic of all combinations.  You might heal faster eating at McDonald’s than trying to do it on organic, unrefined, wholesome, and nutritious food because such food is not as calorie-dense, has a higher water content, has more fiber, and is just too damn filling and unexciting to foster the same level of calorie consumption.

So the unknowns about what is and isn’t healthy for an individual at any given moment are so vast that they are beyond our ability to neatly file into categories of “good” and “bad.”

I am quite serious about all this.  I love the shocking but I’m truly not saying this for shock value.  It would be easier to be liked and for this book to be well-received by continuing to re-affirm your beliefs about what is and isn’t healthy, because when someone says something is healthy that you think isn’t, you react with serious objection.  And in this case, that objection is directed towards me.  But my goal is not to be liked.  My goal here is to provide accurate, truthful, and unbiased information based on my wealth of study and experience.  Most of you reading this don’t need to hear what is and isn’t healthy based on macronutrient breakdowns, nutrient density, ratio of polysaccharides to monosaccharides, and fiber type and quantity.  You need to move on from this overly analytical way of thinking.  For health reasons.”