Eat for Heat

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It’s HERE

Also available on Amazon Kindle HERE

168 Comments

  1. Prob going to get this one.
    Have so much problems staying warm in winter, my body switches into alert mode every time I go out, it’s frustrating

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  2. Are all your books E books? It might help me get a certain someone to read them if they were an actual book or published book. I assume you have many thoughts about this already, Thanks

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    • No paper yet. But working on a collaborative book project that will see paper. Starting this weekend all my books should be available at Amazon and Lulu for kindle and nook download. So that’s something I guess.

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      • I was wondering how long it was going to take you to get around to Kindle. Good deal!

        And I know that Amazon offers a publishing solution for paper, although I haven’t looked at the terms closely.

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      • Yes!

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      • That will be great the certain someone is getting a kindle from my aunt for christmas … should work out :)

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      • Good, I already own them in PDF format but prefer kindle format.

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      • Not that I mind, but I notice that the illustration which comprises this post looks rilly rilly like a paper book.

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  3. Great timing… I’m shivering in a sub-zero winter evening right now & just put a home made rice pudding in the oven (Does rice pudding exist in the US? Highly recommend it for internal central heating, guys…) although the effect wears off too quickly & Matt’s book will help with that I bet… Look forward to reading it :)

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    • Did somebody say rice pudding?! Yum. Care to post a recipe?

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      • Definitely KarenE, here you go:

        Preheat oven to 300F (150C)

        Butter an oven dish – I like to use one with a lid but if you like a thick skin on it (blee) then it could be loose foil, removed 1/2 way or something.

        Put this in the dish:

        - 2 pints of whole milk (some of this can be extra cream if you like)
        - 4oz (100g) short grain rice – this will look like a comically tiny portion but seriously, it’s all you need
        - 2oz (50g) sugar
        - Grated nutmeg, if you like it

        Put it in the oven & leave it for 2.5 hours, but stir it after the first 30 mins.

        Eat in large quantities. Keeps for a couple of days in the fridge when cool. Also tastes great cold.

        Hope this helps :)

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        • Of course, this is better when you use ACTUAL milk & are not a prize idiot who gave up dairy 6 years ago because some ‘health consultant’ lunatic swore it’d help with various unrelated allergies… an idiot who now has no idea how to reintroduce dairy without getting sick… um, because that would be me…

          Does anyone have experience of reintroducing dairy products after such a long time away from them? Are my digestive enzymes screwed for ever? Please someone say there’s hope.

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          • Might be a lactase issue, as in your lactase produktion has ceased to exist ;) If you get stomach issues (bloated, pains, really really smelly farts and loose stinky stools) this might be it. Solution: Lactase enzyme supplements. I inherited this issue myself from both parents so when I gave up veganism I knew I’d still have lactose intolerance. Raw milk I can drink no prob, but heated milk is a no no. Wouldn’t survive w/o my enzymes.. A life w/o Häagen is just too sad…

          • Great tip – thanks Mags :)

          • Maybe Matt’s NEXT book (or post?) could be on food intolerances- if they are real, the physiology behind them, how to overcome them if possible, etc. I have been avoiding many major foods for several years due to blood testing (showing that I have an immune response to those foods) and I am sick of it and just want to eat normal food again. I am starting to cheat here and there to see what will happen and have had some mild symptoms. But I’d love to hear more on this topic from a 180 perspective.

          • Me too – please Matt?

          • Digest Gold for 4 days before hand and than plunge in (I started with sheeps but have no problem with cow as long as its either Kerrygold or raw/grass-fed.

        • This is a traditional dish here in Hungary, with several variations (you can also make it in a pot). Usually eaten with cocoa powder sprinkled on top, sometimes with jam, and sometimes mixed with raw egg yolk before serving. When I was college and lived in the dorm, we had this for supper every evening, literally in the first year (it was the only meal I knew how to prepare).

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        • @Leena Can you also use Goat Milk instead of whole milk? and can the sugar be substituted for coconut sugar or Manuka Honey…….or does it all alter the taste too much?

          I also can imagine this dish tasting great with some added vanilla or cinnamon…

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          • Yep, goat’s milk or any sort would be fine & even rice milk will work if you have an allergy. Coconut sugar or manuka would change the taste but both would be delicious variations so go for it. And vanilla or cinnamon would be great. Yum.

  4. Very Interesting Matt… does this book have any hacks/tips on decreasing fluid consumption when your brain is screaming to drink MORE?

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    • WORD! This is the toughest withdrawal I’ve ever done.

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    • Personally, I would listen to your body. It’s drinking when you’re NOT thirsty that causes issues.

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      • Nah Amy. I don’t think that’s true when you reach a certain point.

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      • The Real Amy…. I CAN”T listen to my body (my feedback is broken)… if I do I down ~ 2 gallons of fluid a day and feel like crap…. the less I drink (especially water) the better…. but having a sort of dry mouth and a brain constantly thinking about more water its tough. Full disclosure I am diabetic, so I’m sure it is related… the very interesting part is that when I drink less my sugars tend to be lower.

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        • If you’re super thirsty, drink a tiny bit of water. Dissolve a little salt under your tongue first. 3-4oz of water and a little salt might just take care of your thirst and you won’t be diluting your internal fluids.

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        • From the Q and A section in the book…

          “My mouth is dry all the time and I’m really thirsty! But if I obey that and drink as much as I want I’m cold and peeing all the time and having problems. What should I do?”

          “Dry mouth is a symptom of the stress response being activated. It is officially a symptom of water intoxication and hyponatremia. It can be very misleading and is not genuine thirst. Eating calorie-dense foods with a lot of salt and choosing beverages with added sugar in place of water or tea is a good starting point for eliminating the dry mouth. As your system relaxes the dry mouth should subside. Be careful about drinking plain water until you feel confident you have distanced yourself from the dry mouth tendency.”

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          • Awesome Sauce… yep I’m definitely gonna buy this one! Thanks Matt

          • I can SO relate to this. Thinking I was just obeying my thirst when I drank 3 litres of plain water a day.

          • Hmm, I’ve almost never had dry mouth unless I’m genuinely dehydrated (like during hangovers). Interesting phenomenon that people’s thirst signals would be all messed up.

          • Funny, but the conventional wisdom about why soft drinks make you want to drink more is that they are loaded with sugar and salt. So, what then IS the real reason?

  5. Hey Matt, what is the main difference between this book and Diet Recovery?

    I’m guessing you will talk more about your recent experiments with sugar/salt and “junk” food?

    And will I be able to create fireballs in my hands? :)

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    • Fireballs…. Mortal Kombay Style or Street Fighter……that distinction will totally determine if I’m buying this one!

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      • Bryan, I’m thinking it’s HADOKEN for the win.

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        • NiCE!!! HYPERUPPERCUT! Actually I had… “Flawless Victory” stuck in my head all day

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    • It’s totally different than Diet Recovery. It is very specific and talks about looking at food and drink in the context of increasing the concentration of body fluids for the generation of more body heat. The basic premise can be applied to just about any dietary belief. I don’t really talk about “nutrition” or “diet” per se.

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  6. My question is about fluids with meals. It was fairly easy to give up the adult sippy cup aka bottled water that I was carrying around all the time. However, I must have a swallow of liquid with pretty much every bite I eat. I’ve done it since I can remember. What liquid should I have with my meals so that I’m not drinking so much water? Milk? Juice? Cream? Kombucha? Cola?

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    • I have a long chapter in it called “What to drink” that will probably answer that for you. I break down the pros and cons of everything from veggie juice to fermented beverages, and certainly soft drinks, milk, half n’ half, and others.

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      • I hope Half-Asses made the list!

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        • Halfasses totally made it into the book!

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  7. So excited about this !!!

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    • Dude, you rock on the sitar.

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  8. This is awesome Matt. The book is black, and the hands are white, and there is fire! I’m sold. This is going to help a lot of people.

    I still haven’t mastered it per say, but my fluid intake is so much better now and I’m finally starting to not pee at night whatsoever. Wholy Shit! In fact, I kind of miss waking up a lot it made it seem like I slept longer. More often now it’s time to go to work but I just closed my eyes!

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  9. It’s taken a while but I have become a big fan of yours Matt. I just purchased 12 Paleo Diet Myths 2 days ago. At first glance, it looks really good.

    I still love the Paleo concept but it does have it’s flaws if you take ___ person’s approach 100%.

    I have Cold Urticaria as of August 6 of this year. It all started immediately right after the swelling of a bee sting I got went away. I’ve been focusing on getting my body temperature up and am feeling I am making progress (I have not been consistently taking my body temp).

    So, in short, I am excited to purchase this book and further support your work.

    In the meantime, I am going to email you about something that I do think you will be interested in.

    All the best Matt! Keep on going against the normal status quo and the “Paleo” status quo!

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    • I actually wish to email you about something but I can’t find your email address or a contact form anywhere. Do you mind sending me one? Todd(at)PrimalToad.com.

      Thanks man.

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      • Hey Toad! Good to see you here. :-)

        Matt is definitely on to something–I’ve been melding his ideas with (very) loose Paleo for a while now and I have been feeling so much better than I was while low-carbing, IFing and all the other stuff the MDA forum-goers love to promote. Problems I didn’t even realize I had related to low body temp have disappeared–now my hands and feet and face are always comfortable (except when I stand on the cold floor barefoot, but hey, I’m not invincible). My energy level and sex drive saw major upticks and my digestion, which has always been a weak point for me with IBS, is practically iron-clad nowadays.

        I spent a long time pretty much just pigging out after reading Diet Recovery, and it felt fantastic. I gained about 30 lbs which put me back at my pre-Primal Blueprint weight, except this time I have way more muscle mass and look much healthier and leaner than I did when I was at this weight before. And now my body seems to be continuing to recomp, very gradually, to the point where month by month I keep noticing my guns are getting higher-caliber and my torso fat mass is diminishing slightly. So signs are good. I’m definitely never going low-carb again, though I’m slowly converging on a high-carb Paleo approach sans the guilt over frequent helpings of ice cream. :-D

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        • Uncephalized, weren’t you on a potato diet?

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        • Ah, yes, I think I do remember you from the MDA forum. Do you still post there? To be honest, I haven’t in months except for just tonight since someone I know has a question that needs to be answered.

          I feel better eating quality foods for sure but now I have zero fear about eating 3-4 white potatoes as part of my meal. I never tried to eat low carb actually. I have probably eaten less than 100 grams of carbs for only a few days in my life.

          I have never had weight problems but I did weigh as little as 129 pounds just before going Paleo. Or, acutally, it may have been just after – I don’t remember. I’m usually around 143 but just a few days ago I was 149 which for a 5’9″ guy seems about right. I don’t have a 6 pack unless I flex but I no longer give a shit about it. I only care about how I feel (and look, I guess but it’s secondary).

          My body temp is low but seems to be on the increase too.

          And those white potatoes… I LOVE THEM!

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      • Hey Todd! I say that like we know each other, but you don’t know me whatsoever. I just recognize you from your frequent comments at MDA. I used to read MDA a lot while doing paleo, but posted maybe once or twice. Anyhow, I immediately recognized you and was happy to see a prominent, if you will, paleo follower here. Have you passed along Matt’s website while there? I tried to share his info with fellow nutrition bloggers, but none would have anything to do with it. Pity, because I can see some of the problems they have would be helped with this information. I stopped blogging and going to paleo sites because I just couldn’t relate anymore. Like many, I felt better initially, but then started to nose-dive, and that’s when I came upon Matt’s website. I’ve been turning my health around ever since. I hope you can get the word out about his info since you seem to be well known in the paleo world. Anyhow, good to see you here.

        PS – I became frustrated as more and more prominent paleo women bloggers began admitting to declining health, especially thyroid issues, but nobody was willing to consider that it had to do with their diet. I don’t know if that has changed since I left the paleo blog world, but I remember being frustrated with it at the time because it felt deceitful to me, in a way, to others following the diet and the potential health consequences it could have for them. I even directly asked several bloggers about the issue, but nobody would comment on it. That was around the time of my “last straw” moment and departure of the paleo world.

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    • Thanks Todd. I like this new book a lot because the basic concept can be applied to any dietary philosophy. Whether you are on a hardcore Paleo diet, or a vegan, or just eating a Standard Western diet, the concept can still be used with beneficial effects. And it’s easy and simple and requires no willpower or anything like that (for most).

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      • Hmmm… so you are saying I should buy this book now I think. I want to but I remember you saying somewhere that you are going to have all your books available via kindle? Do you have a set date on when this will be?

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  10. OK, so where is it? No esta in the store.

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    • Decembah 1, sucka!

      :-D

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      • Haha yeah, I was wondering about that too. I think I’ll buy it just for the very cool (or hot) cover with the Fire Hands. Hey Rob, is there a difference between only feet becoming cold and both hands & feet becoming cold ?

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        • Not sure- it’s usually hands for me, but I attribute that mainly to wearing shoes and socks more than gloves. If you’re using your hands more actively, that might force some circulation there I would guess.

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          • Sometimes as you increase circulation it can favor one over the other as far as extremities go depending on how you are built and usually feet is the last to get the heat but also when it is only the feet and you have tried everything else it can also be related to back and posture especially for those of you at desks all day. Try stretches and concentrating on every bit of the range of motion in your exercise.

  11. Will those who purchased the platinum package also get this ebook for free, or that deal is no longer in place? Thanks.

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  12. Looks good, Matt. Will be picking up a copy.

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  13. Matt – do you discuss issues with bloating in this book? I feel like every since I gave up my Paleo lifestyle and began eating potatoes and other carbs that I’ve suffered from so much bloating – where I look 9 months pregnant most of the time. At first one of my nutritionist friends said it was because I was eating so much gluten – but I get bloated now no matter what I eat. And then my friend recommended HCL which I’ve been taking as well as doing a candida cleanse. In the past 2 months since doing that, I feel like I’ve lost my appetite, have a tiny stomach ache when I take the HCL – have more indegestion and am STILL bloated no matter what I eat. I just hate how awful I feel around my midsection and all the extra midsection fat in addition to what I already had (it’s my big problem area!). Will this kind of stuff be discussed in the new book? Is it already in Diet Recovery? Thanks!

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    • Christy–

      You might have a problem breaking down more complex carbs (disaccharides, polysaccharides). I would try sticking simple sugars only– like ripe fruit (especially tropical), honey, simple syrup, & fruit juice (then slowly add more starchy foods– squashes, potatoes, etc. as tolerated). Proteins and fats usually don’t contribute to bloating unless HCL is REALLY low.

      Good luck!
      Butternutrition

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  14. Hey Matt, did you know the word salt comes from the Latin word salus, which means health, well-being, prosperity! (I’m a Latin teacher so I find those things kind of cool!)

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    • Ahh- like ¡salud! when you sneeze in Spanish, or salutation. Makes sense.

      Are salve and salvation and those derivates also related/from the same root? That’d be appropos too, eh? :-D

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      • Yup, those words are also based on salus.

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    • In Homeric Greek also, salt is called salas (nominative) salatos (genitive) Brian. Our languages unite us :)

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    • And please keep in mind, that the word “soldier” also comes from salt.

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  15. Wonder if im the first to buy it. $10, cant beat that!

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  16. Congrats on this Matt! Have just plugged it on twitter and look forward to reading it (sure I will be done within 24hrs) well done with all the hard work and keep changing lives for the better!

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  17. Hey Matt,
    If we already bought the Platinum collection will we be sent this ebook?
    I thought I remember Paleo being automatically emailed to me, but maybe my memory is failing me :)
    Thanks!

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    • Yes ma’am. Working on getting it sent out to Platinum Collection buyers right now.

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      • Awesome! Thanks, can’t wait to read!

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      • I have also bought the collection and haven’t received Paleo. Do we need to do something to get them? Thank you!

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  18. Great book, Matt!

    It already helped me out, as i was reading last night i noticed that my toes were cold and clammy feeling so i ate a snack of a cheese stick, 2 fig newtons and a half cup of wine. 15 minutes later i had radiating heat from head to toe. Pretty interesting when you start paying attention to this. I think it might be one thing i have been missing so looking forward to seeing the changes now that im putting this into practice.

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  19. Matt,
    Already read it. TWICE. Awesome… I am the applying the principles already. I think my teperature may have gone up a degree just from the excitement.
    Cassie

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  20. THIS is the one I’ve been waiting for! Well done Matt, enjoying the read.

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  21. Wouldnt alcohol actually help with this concept? Not beer of course but wine or hard liquor. Alcohol is diuretic and i have had many mornings where i wake up with much higher libido thanks to a night of drinks, im guessing this is due to the eat for heat effect.

    Also im not saying to binge drink to be healthy but utilizing wine and liquor in small amounts at certain times might be beneficial.

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    • Many ways of looking at this. For one, cortisol and testosterone usually peak together in the morning. Morning peak in libido is not the only indicator of overall health. I noticed waking at 4am with ridiculous erections on a low-carb diet. Yet had insomnia and many stress signs including poor sexual performance and erections at other times of day. Drinking alcohol often has this same effect on people, causing that feeling of increased morning stress. Alcohol, despite making the hands and feet feel warm, is actually known to lower body temperature with the effect lasting for days after exposure. There is also the mysterious overcompensation effect which I talk about in the book – so make sure you are looking beyond just the effects you are feeling at the moment or the next morning but beyond that. But I do suspect, having said all that, that small amounts frequently could be very therapeutic actually. I should do a thorough alcohol experiment, lol.

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      • Good points. And i agree that you should do an alcohol experiment. haha.

        Just a N=1 but my buddy is unlike anyone else i know. He drinks around 18 beers a day everyday. Now he is far from healthy, he has bad bone degenerative issues and cartilage issues, but aside from that he is the epitome of high metabolism. Very lean and muscular, sweats profusely and a human heat generator, high testosterone (every girl he bangs gets addicted to him), only needs like 4-5 hours of sleep a night, very resilient to stress. I cant help but think that the amount of alcohol he drinks has something to do with it. He also only eats about once a day late at night, he says he gets most of his calories from beer. Anyway, theres no way i would ever drink to excess like that, he is without a doubt an alcoholic. But still very interesting. I always tell him that he should get extensive blood tests done because it would be really interesting.

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        • Maybe every girl he bangs is drinking 18 beers a day too and she just doesn’t know any better.

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  22. I spent the afternoon reading Eat for Heat. Nice work Matt. I am a licensed acupuncturist in San Francisco, and I can’t tell you how many patients I see who are “dying by their own hands” in their misguided quest for health.

    For years, I have been telling people to stop guzzling water. I learned this the hard way because I almost did myself in twice by jumping on the water guzzling bandwagon. Like all insidious health dogma (alkaline diets, etc) it is very seductive in theory, but when you look at the results in practice – and the fact that there is no historical precedent for it — you see what complete foolishness it is.

    I see so many people (mostly women, since they are more “health conscious”) clutching water bottles and running to the bathroom to pee constantly (“Oh, i am so cold all the time!”). When I tell them they have to stop drinking so much water, they look at me as if I just told them to kill a bunny rabbit.

    The apex of this insanity, for me, happened when I stumbled upon a local health “guru” – he called himself a “master” (never a good sign) and wore flowing Tibetan robes and such (I’m not joking). No, he wasn’t the Dalai Lama, but you wouldn’t know that by looking at him. He had his groupies (cult members) drink 2-3 LITERS of hot water by 6am every morning. That was the main thrust of his health philosophy – that Americans were toxic and dehydrated and needed “more hot water!”

    I must sheepishly admit that I actually hung out with these folks (yes, I’ve done it all), as I was naive and in the beginning of my Chinese medicine training and this guy was quite charismatic and persuasive. But then I started to observe: People lacked energy. People were cold all the time. People were apathetic. People were peeing a lot. I started to develop vicious sleep apnea (probably from brain swelling), heart palpitations, and had terrible insomnia. The experiment lasted 3 months for me before I came to my senses and realized that this was total insanity that had no historical basis.

    It was a good learning experience, but what was really important is how people will totally ignore their bodily experience in their quest for imagined physical purity and “health.” Much like the dude you reported about who killed himself on water guzzling and an “alkaline” diet. If you’re getting shitty results, regardless of your philosophy, you’d better change what you’re doing.

    Sooo…it’s nice to see someone who is writing about this topic and getting it out there more. We need more salt. We need less fluids. We need more “normal” foods and less “health” foods. It’s amazing how weak and degenerated we are as a people compared to a few generations ago. They ate real food. They worked hard. They weren’t pansies.

    Also, if you haven’t already gone there, some of the early writings of George Ohsawa are totally in line with this kind of philosophy, and give more insight into the “potassium” issue, which is actually very significant. I could write a lot about that right now, but then this would be a very large post.

    Suffice to say, people should be mindful with high potassium foods, especially in a metabolically weakened state. All of them are cooling – very cooling. Humans were not meant to drink coconut water in Boston in January. To be brief, that’s why you only find high potassium foods naturally in warm to hot geographical locations: Citrus fruits, avocados, tropical fruit, fruit in general, sweet potatoes, many night shades, coconut water, spinach, etc all originated in very warm to hot environments. Fruit in temperate zones is only found for few months seasonally. There is a reason for it.

    Potassium and sodium have a dualistic yin/yang relationship. Sagen Ishizuka was a very famous doctor in Japan who wrote a number of popular books about this relationship and it formed the basis of his dietary treatments for his patients. He felt that people were “sodium” or “potassium” types. His work has some interesting parallels to George Watson’s metabolic discoveries in terms of oxidation rates amongst the sick and mentally ill, with fast oxidizers needing more sodium and slow oxidizers needing more potassium.

    Also, Guy Schenker’s An Analytical System of Clinical Nutrition is a must read, if you haven’ read it.

    Cheers,

    Sean

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    • Sean, can you explain a bit more about potassiums role in “cooling”. What are the mechanisms? I find this very interesting, thanks!

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      • Aye, it’s 2am in the morning for me, so I’ll be relatively brief and “non-technical.” We could say that given calcium, sodium, potassium, and magnesium, that both potassium and magnesium tend to speed up oxidative reactions in the body. They burn faster. If one is steeped in chemistry, then the actual color spectrum of the flame and other chemical characteristics of these essential nutrients are sufficiently different as to suggest their metabolic effects in the body. Practically speaking, eating or drinking high potassium foods will make you feel cold. Down a quart of orange juice (Ray Peat style) or a couple of cartons of coconut water – then see how you feel. This will differ for some people, in terms of whether they feel “good” or “bad” from this, but almost everyone will feel cooler or outright cold.

        Eating salty foods, for the most part, will make you feel warm, hence it’s natural in the winter and cold environments to crave and eat savory, salty fare.

        George Ohsawa, in the supremely interesting “The Book of Judgment,” – out of print, published in 1965 and usually to be had used on Amazon, details it all in a much more interesting and technical way. While I don’t agree with everything he says nor do I agree with how his successor (Michio Kuchi) codified and dogmatized macrobiotics, Ohsawa was a prolific writer and totally brilliant and was onto some very interesting things relevant to our concerns.

        George Watson, in Nutrition and Your Mind – also out of print – is one of the fathers of what is called “metabolic” nutrition – which is also a great and relevant read. He found that many people have substantially different tendencies in terms of how they oxidize carbohydrates and fats. Some people have a natural predisposition to favor fat oxidation and they tend to have alkaline leaning venous blood ph. Others tend toward hypoglycemia and fast oxidation of glucose preferentially, and tend toward a more acid venous blood ph. Rather than all the misleading mumbo-jumbo about “alkalinity” and ph, Watson actually did blood draws and did some really fascinating work around diet and how it really effects venous blood ph. He found that the further one was from a general ideal of – oh it escapes me now – but extremes in either direction tended to cause severe mental illness for some people and physical illness for others. He was able to correct this by altering macronutrient ratios and also supplementing certain minerals and vitamins. For slow oxidizers – those who oxidize fats preferentially and carbohydrates poorly, potassium and magnesium would speed up their ability to oxidize glucose, and thus produce more carbon dioxide, the main krebs cycle metabolite of carb metabolism. This would produce a greater “acid” effect which was actually a good thing, because these people tended to have overly alkaline blood. For a hypoglycemic, a fast oxidizer, potassium and magnesium would speed up their already fast glucose oxidation, which would make their blood even more acid and throw them even more seriously out of balance. These people responded much better to sodium and calcium. Sodium, you might say, is a slow and steady flame like a log, whereas as potassium burns quickly and fast. You might look at it as the difference between an endothermic and exothermic reaction.

        In traditional Chinese medicine and Ayurveda, pretty much all of the foods that are high in potassium are found in warm environments are considered energetically “cold” or cooling. In warm environments or with “hot” people, these can bring balance. In cold environments and with “cold” metabolically screwed people, this can contribute to more imbalance. This is why I am a little suspect about binging on high potassium foods as a part of healing a condition where “cold” is a primary symptom. From a standard nutritional perspective, when you’re just dealing with things like calories, “carbs,” and other modern concepts there is no radical difference between a bowl of rice, a potato, and a glass of orange juice. Sure, there are simple and so-called complex sugars, but that;s about as far as nutritional science goes in the mainstream. Calcium, sodium, potassium, and magnesium, all have profound metabolic effects AND have profound effect on the autonomic nervous system, as Pottenger showed in his great work. Some stimulating the parasympathetic system; others the sympathetic system; while others have a more inhibiting effect. Sugar also burns quickly and is considered cooling. I find that things like orange juice send my body temperature plummeting. Salty, coconut oil fried potatoes, on the other hand, give me some lasting energy and heat.

        Iodine and Iodide are also very important to all of this, and are one of the last dogmas that needs to be challenged, but that’s a long story for another time…

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        • Thanks for taking the time and sharing that Sean. Really interesting stuff.

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        • “Down a quart of orange juice (Ray Peat style)”

          ray peat has never recommended anyone “down” a quart of oj. lol.

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        • Sean,

          You’ve written interesting stuff.
          I would like to ask you some questions via your email, if you can give me.

          Thank you

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  23. Hey Matt.

    Just read your book…fantastic! I suffer from Raynaud’s and ALWAYS have cold hands and feet. My sleep is sporadic at best (don’t remember the last time I actually slept 6 hours straight). I don’t go the bathroom more than normal though.

    However, after reading your book, I made potatoes fried in coconut oil….and my feet and hands warmed within 20 minutes and my temp actually read 98 degrees! Now, I realize this may still seem low but my average is usually between 95.9 and 96.5!!

    Will definitely play around with drinking only to thirst (I have always been downing the water).

    I am off gluten but really wondering if everything will change for me once I can get my temp regulated and my body relaxed. Thoughts?

    Thanks again!

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    • Hi Richard,
      Just thought I’d let you know that I’m handling some gluten now that my temps are up. I had blood tests showing major gluten/casein allergy in 2009. So I have avoided them for several years. However, my health stayed crap during that time.
      Now after doing the 180 health diet recovery program for 4 weeks, I can have bits of dairy & gluten with only minimal side effect. Too much bread or pasta in one day still causes boating, bowel cramps & joint pain – but smaller amounts are ok.
      Socially, this is a total blessing. Hopefully your intolerance will improve too.
      Cheers,
      KJ

      Reply
  24. Matt Stone,

    I am eating now to the point where my hands and feet are getting warmer, however, what usually ends up happening is only one “side” of my body will get warm. For example, I’ll only experience warmth in my right hand and right foot, or vice versa. Do you have ANY idea of why this is? O.O

    Reply
    • I also have a “colder hand.” IMO it’s because my back is messed up, so the wiring is squeezed off somewhere. If you learn about a different explanation, I’d be interested to hear about it.

      Reply
  25. Thanks for the insight. Would you say (or anyone else on here) say boiled potatoes with salt would be sufficient to help someone with raynaud’s (not me)?

    As well, I wonder if you can speculate/tell me why when I eat meat heavy meals at dinne (say, braised fatty lamb), with pltenty of salt, lemon juice and some veg, that during the night I wake up a few times and at those times drink about half an 800ml drink bottle? What would this indicate? Sometimes I hink I overdo it on the salt and get theirstty, but often I also feel like I have a ‘dry mouth’ and feel like drinking in this conetxt. Any behind these things?

    Any ingihts would be welcome

    Reply
    • Well, a simple answer would be (based on that type of dinner – meat, salt and some vegetables) that:

      1) Without any substantial carbohydrate (potatoes, grains, etc) which get metabolize into CO2 and water and

      2) With a lot of salt

      perhaps you do get a little temporarily dehydrated. If I eat a lot of meat for dinner and salt without any significant carbs sources – just vegetables – (that is, an Atkins-style dinner), i either wake up at night thirsty and overstimulated, or have really really dark and concentrated urine in the morning. That’s just my experience, but sometimes these answers are not that complicated. In Matt’s book, it’s clear that he’s eating significant amounts of salt, but also lots of starch carbs, protein, etc.

      Reply
      • Thanks. Re what you suggested about over stimulatation- are you talking about exciatory amino acids that, eg aren’t balanced by the ‘gelatnious’ ones? I know this is Peat’s recommendation (does he say anything about having carbs alondside proeints as well?

        I wonder if I might have blood sugar issues as well, there mght be some utility in testing in the night (hopefully it won’t wake me up…)

        Thanks again for your response/insight.

        Reply
      • Sean

        Could you give me your email or business website address?

        thanx!

        Reply
  26. Awesome new book. Starting to work my way through it……I have experienced tremendous improvement from long term adrenal fatigue since starting Diet Recovery last month. It has literally turned my life around already – and I’m sure things will just keep improving. Your program has been a life saver for me, thank you so much!

    Reply
  27. Great book! I’m still a Weston A Pricin’ whole foods eatin’ kind a girl, but I love knowing that junk food is a-okay sometimes. I also am going to start paying attention to how I feel warm/cold wise and make adjustments. Typical food schedule here in Argy is Breakfast: some sort of warm milk (latte, malt+milk, maté cocido) and pastries, Big Lunch, afternoon floury snack with maté, and small – big dinner (in my house usually leftovers). If I make eggs in the morning, people think I’m disgusting or crazy. BTW, I was born in 1989 but still got all the 80s movies quotes, thanks to my young 42 year old mom who rocked the 80s, didn’t let me watch television, but let me watch all her fav movie recommendations.

    Reply
  28. I just read the book. Now I know why fruit and fruit juice, coffee, IF , Peatism, etc don’t work for me. There is so much misinformation out there about diet and food…. Although I believe you are on to something here Matt. Thanks for thinking outside of everything.

    Reply
    • It is pretty incredible how many aspects of Peat are refuted in Eat for Heat…I’m wondering if this is why a ton of people are having problems getting their temps up and not responding to Thyroid. I would love to hear more about how Fluid Concentration correspond with Diabetics or developing diabetes.

      Reply
  29. To those who have dairy “issues,” Coconut Bliss – a coconut milk-based ice cream, is a wonderful way to put down some calories and fat. A pint tends to have around 48-56 grams of coconut fat, which is nice, and you get about 1,000 yummy calories in a pint. I’ve been putting away the peanut butter and chocolate flavor a lot lately.

    : )

    Reply
  30. Hi Matt
    I told a french friend about your last book, because I know she’s always cold at night. She said, her problem isn’t located on the hand/feet, but in the “middle” = she feels a cold chest etc.
    Do you think the approach “Eat for Heath” would work too in her case ?
    I really like the diet-”add-on” logic in this one ! great concept !

    Reply
  31. Does anyone have any comments on the potassium content in potatoes?

    Basically I am trying to get more salt in me earlier in the day but having difficulty. A breakfast of fried potatoes and eggs would be a great way to do this, but wouldn’t the high potassium negate the salt?

    In general, does anyone have suggestions as to getting much more sodium into the body earlier in the day? I don’t have a lot of time in the morning to cook, and lunch has to be pre-made or store bought. I know that bread has a decent amount but more than one serving of gluten a day gets me feeling itchy and bloated…

    Reply
    • I like the potatoes because they lend themselves to so much salt, as do most starches, in effect balancing out the potassium. Fried potatoes and cheesy eggs are a great way to start the day.

      Reply
      • I’ve had cheesy grits the last two days and they are really stoking the furnace. Grits are another thing that take ridiculous quantities of salt to be palatable. The main reason I’m doing it though is that grits cook in less than 10 minutes and I don’t have time to do much more than that in the a.m.

        Reply
  32. Exited to read this!

    I may be off topic, but I have a question for y’all. So I almost fully restored my health from diet freak land and have started the exercise again. In order to be comfortable in my body again, I think I need to get down about 30 pounds. I try to exercise intensely about 30 mins a day at least, and walk as much as I can. I got some inspiration for moves recently on bodybuilding.com. With sometimes as little as 20 mins of weight lifting a day, I am ravenously hungry. I could eat all day. The eating makes me feel great and energetic, so why not? The thing I didn’t get and still don’t, is how the people on the site say they eat. Clean eating, some claim to eat around 1500 calories (women). Is it truth? Ar they lying about their binges? Is it normal to be lifting every day for at least an hour and eat 1500 cals? I am trying the “eat as much as I want and exercise tactic”…. It seems to make sense to me. Anyone have any stories about their own experience?

    Reply
    • Hey Lucie,

      They might be eating 1500 calories, but likely not without cost. The goal here is to have a robust, hypermetabolic state, and fuel is valuable to that end. With the volume of exercise you’re talking about, I can’t see 1500kcal as nearly enough to avoid metabolic consequences.

      And hey- make sure to get plenty of rest and recovery- 30 minutes of intense exercise a day, plus lots of walking may not be necessary and might be counter-productive. I won’t say definitely stop, because for some people that volume is manageable. But it’s not sustainable or beneficial for most. At the very least, don’t ever ignore hunger, and get plenty of quality rest to compensate for the physical demands.

      Reply
      • Thanks a lot Rob for the input. I really appreciate it. You are right, I way prefer having that robust metabolism and healthy body, but it’s so hard not to get into the exercise and eat less trap when you don’t feel so comfortable in your body (don’t get me wrong, I am fully aware of the consequences and will avoid it at all costs!). The gain was so rapid though that I want the drop to be too. I guess it does not work that way :P. When you say less exercise, how much would you consider being adequate? I did realize that the only thing that was keeping me from feeling exhausted was having lots at dinner and sleeping about 8-9 hours.

        Reply
        • Glad to offer whatever I can.

          Adequate depends on your lifestyle, your goals, your stress level outside of exercise, what your feelings areabout the exercise itself, all sorts of things. A Facebook commenter last months offered this, which I like:

          Move about everyday (could be mobility drills, “working in” (à la Chek), hiking, gardening, doing your errands by bike, etc.), partake in an activity/a sport you enjoy every once in a while, commit to serious, progressive, intense strength training 4 to 10 times a month, and reap the results of a healthy body and plenty of extra time for other things too

          So again, it depends. If you love tennis and you play an hour or two a day, can’t get enough of it, and are eating plenty and sleeping well: that may not be too much. If you’re dragging yourself out of bed at the crack of dawn to do a dreaded 5k morning run, then going to a stressful job and eating food you don’t really enjoy: that’s almost certainly too much.

          I’d say focus on your energy levels, including your energy for continued engagement with that activity. If it stays booming, keep on trucking.

          Reply
          • Great advice! Like Matt says in the book, it may be the exercise overtime that changes your body composition. I lost about 9 lbs in 4 months, and haven’t exercised that much…just once in a while. (I just decided to start more exercise recently to get results faster – starting to think I was wrong). I would really loooove a post on the concept of progressive exercise to see body changes! Thank you Rob again. Muchas gracias, really!

          • Hi Lucie

            I weight train- and definitely need to eat well and rest well to recuperate-
            1500 calories would be a joke for me- I would be well and truly in starvation land.
            3000+ is more like it.
            And as you say- it is oh so easy to fall into the undereating , overexercising trap! but in the long run it is extremely counter productive and will lead to a lowered metabolism, potential weight rebound, and will stalemate exercise results.

            I would say that as a generally rule- exercise less and eat more;
            and make sure you are not falling into a weakened catabolic state (too much exercise, not enough food, not enough rest, not enough recovery time).

            Over time with weighttraining I have definitely improved muscle density and strength. But if I dont eat enough- improvements stop, and recovery is hard.

    • They’re probably binging regularly and not reporting that online because they feel ashamed of it.

      Reply
  33. This morning, I had a breve latte and a bagel with a shit ton of butter, then after work, salmon and huge plate of au gratin potatoes and some strawberries with minimal water (much less than usual after reading the book) and I’ve felt like I’ve been on a super high dose of Adderall all day. I drink coffee decently regularly, but today I’ve been uncomfortably energetic to the point that I was having to jump up and down and dance around in the walk in fridges at work and drop and do pushups and squats in my room.

    It’s been like this for a solid and unchanging 9 hours….I am usually a hyper person but this is fucking ridiculous and I don’t need to feel like I’m on meth….why did this happen? O.o We’ll see tomorrow if it’s a fluke I guess.

    Reply
    • Still tweakin today @_____@

      Reply
  34. Am really enjoying the book. Came to the part where Matt mentioned his girlfriend had gone up a couple of cup sizes and nearly fell off my chair, because that is exactly what has happened to me since I have been eating more warming foods.

    My husband is VERY impressed and thanks Matt from the bottom of his heart :)

    Reply
    • I need to write a natural breast enhancement book haha.

      Reply
      • Write a “male” enhancement book that works and doesn’t require hanging weights from your Toledo and the world will be your oyster, sir :)

        Reply
        • Ok, but did your girlfriend also increase in bodyfat Matt??

          Or did the increase in breast size come without bodyfat increase?

          I can increase breast size a great deal with bodyfat increase…
          Regardless of warming foods or not.

          Reply
          • Ah yes,
            and also Mishkam?
            Did your breast increase come with added bodyfat ?
            Or nay..

          • I don’t really think I have put on bodyfat, because I can still fit all my pants and jeans, but have had to buy new bras and tops to accommodate the increase in boob size.

          • Wow- very cool!
            It is interesting- I wonder what the mechanism is?
            Maybe improving the hormonal profile through the better body functioning?..

          • Yes it probably is the fact that now my body is functioning better. I also do the eat up large in the first half of the day thing and then basically fast for the rest of it. Sort of what Chief advocates but in reverse order. So that might be why I haven’t put on bodyfat.

          • I have had an increase in breast size this year, as I have been focusing more on Matts ideas- more sugar/salt, less fluid, eating well.
            I have also had an increase in bodyfat however-
            and cant fully tell whether the breast increase is more than I would normally get with this level of fat increase or not!

            I eat up large in the first half of the day, and very much less for the rest of the day.
            I think it does help to offset fat increase- but definitely doesnt completely negate it in my case.

  35. Hey Matt,

    Is it possible that Alcohol can raise body temps and metabolism? I have noticed since I was in my early 20′s, that whenever I drank some alcohol such as beer, hardcider ect. (except for wine) that I would start to sweat profusely from my head (like rain drops falling off my forehead) and that my upper chest and neck area would feel extremely warm to the point where it would be embarrassing and uncomfortable (the good thing may be that it prevented me from being an alcoholic). Usually, it would take only a few minutes after taking my first sips that this warming sensation would start. Any thoughts?

    Reply
  36. I am about halfway thru the book, but yes, I am Mrs. I have to pee 4 times before I can go to sleep at night and thought I was the only one!!! Though I have never been much of a sugar beetle (carbs and salt are my anti-drug), I now have some perspective and justification as to why I have been craving a little handful of potato chips and chocolate chips together every night :)
    You might be a crazy son of a gun, but you are on to something.

    Reply
  37. OMG, this might be your best book yet. If you DO write that natural breast enhancement book, it will be like minting money, I tell you. This is really clicking with some weird shit that had been going on in my life. Long story short: stress, plus getting back to hard physical exercise had been making me drink coffee for the first time since college, plus tea, plus booze at night to come down from all that caffeine. Also for the first time since being committed to the 180 lifestyle, I was cold in my hands and feet, using my space heater at work, etc.

    Here’s what I think was going on: I started drinking distilled water to get rid of summer swelling in feet and hands. That was fine in summer, but as fall rolled around, I kept drinking distilled. I was craving salt like mad, in the form of Jimmy Johns vito sandwiches, but not really recognizing it. I’d come from the gym all hot and sweaty, guzzle distilled water like a mofo and then be freezing all night. Drinking tea and having a hot toddy before bed. So the book is making things click for me. Distilled water is great after a big sausage binge, or a bowl of pho or in the most humid hot parts of summer, but not so much the rest of the time.
    I’m starting to taper down the caffeine (Drinking green tea with a ton of honey, adding lots of cream and sugar to coffee and tea, etc.) and increase salt. Where’s my bag of money spice?

    Reply
  38. Matt,

    Great book!

    Any tips on a racing pulse in morning? My temps are great (waking at 98+) and they get HIGHER after breakfast but so does my pulse?!?

    Reply
    • Me too. Temp and pulse are always high, even though I still have hypothyroid symptoms. Sometimes a big meal will get my pulse to come down a bit, but not much. Would also love some tips for this.

      Reply
    • Genevieve (quel joli prénom!) what are you eating for breakfast?

      Reply
  39. Matt, Congrats on the book, which I have just bought, together with 180 Degree Diabetes. I am reading both simultaneously. On the other hand, you seem to take a different approach to refined carbs and sugar in Eat for Heat than in 180 Diabetes. Has your opinion changed?

    Reply
  40. After reading the book I wonder which option will provide more heat:
    a. Drinking very little to nothing in the morning, but quite a bit (16 oz) at lunch, because I will be pretty thirsty by then.
    b. Drinking a bit more with my breakfast/morning snack (8 oz) and less with my lunch (8 oz)

    Reply
  41. Matt, you speak of the time of the day regarding cold hands and feet. My hands and feet get cold when I am inactive, such as I am now in front of my computer. It does not depend on the time of day. Also, when I start moving around such as doing housework, I heat up very quickly and will break into a sweat if I don’t peel off some layers of clothing. The hands and feet don’t heat up quickly, though, even if the rest of me is hot. Any comments?

    Reply
    • I have the same experience. If I am cold, it is often when inactive, and moving around (just putzing around, I don’t exercise)for a while helps. And also when the house is 64 in mid-winter, it’s very common to find myself cold. My basal temp is pretty OK. It’s always ranged in the mid 97s to 98.0 pre ovulation and then jumps to the low to mid 98s post ovulation (or even higher towards end of day, 99 is not uncommon).

      I do notice some improvement in my usual midmorning chilliness when I’ve eaten a large breakfast, but I still get chilly in the evening while veg-ing and usually need a hot shower to warm up. I’ll try a salty snack or less fluids in the evening and see what happens. Problem is, I find myself really thirsty after 4 pm or so, especially if dinner was salty.

      My hands at times get maddeningly cold and white, probably Raynaud’s syndrome. At times I’ve run my hands under super hot water to force the blood back into them. It’s really a curse.

      I’ve read the book (thanks Matt!!) and hoping the salt balance will help eliminate at least some of that. I do feel like some of the coldness is environmental (like I said, the 64 degree house) and activity related.

      Reply
  42. Salty coffee=toasty body. Great tip!

    Reply
    • That one sounds familiar! :-)

      Reply
  43. Thank you for this useful topic. We will continue to follow.

    Reply
  44. OK Matt, this is downright spooky. After 24 hours of observation after reading your book, I have noted when my hands and feet are warm, I pee yellow, when they are cold, I pee clear. EVERY TIME. AND, I have noted that I instantly get colds and hands and feet after I have a cup of tea, even with a lot of honey. Wow. This is crazy. Last night, I tried to warm up by having a salty/sugary snack during my stressful time, which is right when I get home from work (I’ve been known to eat raw pasta at this time of day when I was trying to lo-carb) and I felt so much better. I made a killer Turkey Pot Pie for dinner and I was so hot last night that I actually heard my pulse in my ears and had wrestless legs. So I guess I went too far. I want to try to even out my temps during the day, so I’m going to get up early and make a BIG breakfast with no tea or coffee and see how that treats me. Keep on keepin’ on. You are the wind beneath my wings.

    Reply
    • I know. I’m like totally the pee whisperer now. Thanks for not thinking I’m crazy. It’s always awesome to see the ol’ peeps bustin’ a comment from time to time. You’ll make mistakes and have restless legs and all that weird stuff from time to time. But keep playing around with it. You’ll soon be a Pee Master too.

      Reply
      • I downed some 1000 cals in the form of sweetened condensed milk (it was easy) and an hour later experienced a moderately severe case of a knight’s armor.
        Lots of other brilliant observations in the book, money well spent. EfH was the first dietbook I ever purchased, how cool is that

        Reply
      • Ha, the boy would love that. Eating Fritos and drinking an airplane sized Mr. Pibb, instead of the usual 10:00 a.m. tea and fruit snack.

        Reply
      • You should read Dirk Benedict’s autobiography, Confessions of a Kamikaze Cowboy – he has a lot of interesting things to say about peeing, totally in line with what you’re writing about here. Also about fluid intake, etc, etc.

        Reply
        • Wait is that Dirk Benedict as in star of Battlestar Galactica, the A-team and my 7th grade locker?

          Reply
          • What I would give to see Jenny standing alongside her 7th grade locker adorned with Dirkness.

          • That’s the MAN. His autobiography is brilliant and he talks about peeing! Hahaha

  45. The review I (hopefully) posted on amazon:

    Our thermostat is set on 67F

    Revolutionary!! I have been following Matt Stone´s research for nine months now and I must say that implementing the changes outlined in this book and his blog have been a boon for my overall health: chronic back pain eliminated (chiropractor amazed), pores closing, hair and nails growing like crazy, soft skin, no PMS, better concentration, better sleep etc., etc. etc. Heaven! Best of all, and specifically related to the information presented in this book, the elimination of stress and anxiety and an overarching feeling of calm. My husband now calls me Buddha and I am ecstatic to say the least, as things keep heating up. Last winter it would have been unthinkable to set the thermostat in the mid-sixties. Do your health and metabolism a big favor and check out this awesome book!

    Reply
    • Thank you so much Jill. This will definitely help in the battle of Eat for Heat vs. Tater Haters in the Kindle popularity contest.

      Reply
  46. I can’t believe this! Before going to bed last night, I pigged out on potato chips, dates and downed small glass of water with about a tablespoon of salt dissolved in it. This adrenally challenged insomniac slept like a baby! Until 4 am, that is. Then I grabbed my stash of salt and sugar which were on my nightstand and had some. I was actually able to get back to sleep and slept for 4 more hours! First glimmer of hope for recovery that I’ve had in a while.

    Also, had a wonderful breakfast of scrambled eggs with spinach and lots of salty feta cheese, accompanied with butter-fried hash browns. Yum! My day has gotten off to a great start!

    Reply
    • Its ironic to me that you mentioned pigging out on carbs prior to bed and getting a good night’s sleep Fearless Mum. Last night I downed a half of a bag of Sweet Potatoe Totilla chips and had one of the best nights sleep in a long time. I bought that bag after being at Barnes & Nobles reading up on some diet books. One of them called “THE 7 PRINCIPLES OF FAT-BURNING” by Eric Berg, DC. recommends not eating (starchy carbs)prior to bed as it disrupts GH and disturbs your sleep. He also says to avoid all starchy foods such as potatoes, rice etc.(but not beans/lentils?), because they prevent fat burning hormones to do their work and instead, people should eat plenty of Cruciferous veggies and fruit (especially Apples). He also believes that fruit should be eaten after 5pm and not during the day which is “against the grain” in standard Dietary Dogma of today. Matt, are you familiar with this book?

      Reply
  47. I’ve been reading Dr. Berg’s book and following his principles, too but now I think that it is going to become a dust collector.

    Reply
  48. Can I download a copy from anywhere other than Amazon or Kindle store?! I’m in the UK where it’s not available online.

    Reply
  49. Matt,

    Awesome e-book, as Im read it I was also thinking that nobody else has put together information in this way and with this focus, its downright refreshing. I am wondering if this approach could be helpful for digestive disorders in general. While I love the notion of looking at the body as a whole and starting at the cell level, it becomes really tricky for those of us with digestive issues (for example I have a really sensitive digestive track and more salt actually hurts, although I feel AMAZING when I eat it, I do it anyway and I know I am one of those who needs it). How to does one even start to eat the recommended foods (and I was drooling with the meal plans you wrote about) when symptoms prevent one from doing so??–if I look at saturated fat, dairy, my gallbladder has a fit. I think this is an area in need of attention, eat for heat approach tailored to the those with compromised digestion to start with. I hate all the supplements and special diegstive diets,and have not had success with these, but whats an H pylori infected acid reflux gallbladder compromised low thyroid food intolerant woman to do?

    keep up the great work…

    Reply
    • It is possible for a lot of people to literally eat their way out of digestive problems. I’ve done it myself and have even had people with severe inflammatory bowel disease overcome it by eating more, more complex meals, the works. Salt, and just staying in that warming state can be highly beneficial as well. Crashing out from high fluid to food/salt ratio has a way of making digestion come to a screeching halt. For now I would strongly emphasize carbohdyrates and eat very frequently. See if you can at least stay warm all day and get your bowels moving properly.

      Reply
  50. Matt,

    As you’ve now become ‘the pee king’, I was wondering if you knew something about this weird thing too….

    I’ve noticed that lately, I usually feel highly anxious/OCD thoughts/restless right before or after I’m about to poop. Also when I get up at night to pee,I feel my heart pounding strongly afterwards when in bed sleeping in again.

    But the poop-thing is just so weird….also on days when I take some probiotics I feel really depressed/bad too and a while back when I tried some kefir I felt so extremely lethargic&depressed and also very tired,so I’m guessing I’m again causing huge negative gutflora/Candida overgrowth…..? Is this the obvious die-off that get’s talked about,when I added the healthy bacteria?

    Reply
    • I’ve been a bit of a numpty: after I paid for the Eat for Heat ebook I tried to download it to my phone, which doesn’t support the format. How can I now access the download pagefor next time from my computer?!
      Thanks

      Reply
      • I sent you an email Elizabeth. Hopefully that takes care of it.

        Reply
  51. Any correlation with metabolism and height? I’ve been implementing your ideas onto my family, and I’m just curious in how all this would affect height seeing that we’re aiming to stay in a non-stressful more anabolic state most of the time

    Reply
    • Having a high rate of cellular energy production actually looks like it keeps height more on the low side. Perhaps this has something to do with growth hormone being secreted in larger amounts under great stress. Very tall people are almost always hypothyroid to some degree, and a few studies have shown a bit of a reverse correlation between height and longevity. Generally amongst any species, the smallest members of that species have the highest metabolic rate (pound for pound) and the longest lifespan. But in my experience people who are very short often had developmental issues in their youth from not being able to achieve proper anabolism. So there is probably a middle ground between the two.

      Reply
  52. I just bought Eat For Heat and look forward to trying out some of the ideas. I have diabetes type II, however, so I am wondering if this info applies to diabetics? I just bought your ebook on Diabetes. Haven’t looked at it yet but I see it is dated 2009. I imagine a lot of your ideas have changed since then.

    Where would I find your most recent recommendations for people with diabetes type 2, Matt?

    Reply
    • I would really like to hear about your current diabetic recommendations as well, although my guess is they are more or less in line with your general recommendations like saturated fat, salt, starch and sugar.

      Reply
    • I have heard good things from a type 2 thus far with an Eat for Heat style approach, keeping the hormones that raise blood sugar quieted down. That’s a primary focus and a more efficient way to achieve it, and I think you stand to gain a lot as a type 2. Please keep me posted if you notice some substantial benefits including lower sugars.

      Reply
  53. I am in the UK and bought the book for my Kindle no problem. I am loving it and really liek your style of writing. The Paleo Myths book was superb and has finally turned me “normal” again after too long in the gnostic world of food secrets. Cutting back on my tea and coffee drinking is my current focus as I get my hands and feet warmed up.

    Great book

    Reply
  54. Hello,
    I, like many others here, have tried various other diets before, including Peatarian-ish approach as well. I’m not exactly sure what advice Matt gives, but from the reviews I’ve read on amazon, it seems to do a lot with fluid.
    Before I jump into purchasing the book, I have a question that I’d like to ask. For those with kidney stones (me: I have one stuck in the ureter somewhere – no symptoms yet), isn’t fluid intake important? Is it safe to drink less fluids if you tend to form kidney stones? All the internet sources seem to suggest “drink more water! 3L!”
    Thank you!

    Reply
  55. It sounds like you have some very good points regarding diet and metabolism. I would like to get your point of view regarding the influence of sugar on cancer patients and those who genetically are predisposed to cancer (many relatives on both sides of the family, or those who have BRCA1/2, etc.). I am a cancer research scientist, and have read many studies showing that high blood sugar levels contribute to cancer proliferation. In my own studies, if I want my cancer cells to grow faster invitro, I add glucose to the media. My mother’s oncologist told her to stop eating sugar during chemotherapy. Just google scholar the amount of research showing that sugar contributes to cancer growth and there are many peer reviewed science papers regarding the subject. Is this issue addressed in the book? Thanks for letting me know!

    Reply
    • Eating a high carbohydrate diet lowers blood sugar levels, A1C, postprandial glucose, yada yada – because it lowers the hormones that raise blood sugar and are responsible, in large part, for most degenerative disease (glucocorticoids). Improving metabolic rate improves glucose metabolism and glucose clearance. I agree that disturbances in glucose metabolism are one of several hallmarks of cancer. Eliminating sources of glucose is not the proper therapy for correcting that problem.

      Reply
  56. Matt, is regular salt and sugar sufficient to get back to sleep? I tried maple syrup and salt, but did not get the desired effect. Thanks.

    Reply
    • You may need something a little more substantial and satisfying.

      Reply

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