Juicing Q & A with Matt Stone

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By Rob Archangel, 180DegreeHealth.com staff writer

Ahoy, buckaroos- Rob here, emissary from the world wide web, letting you know about more happenings from Mattarino and 180D. Matt recently sat down (electronically) for a question and answer session with Rosie at the Natural Maven to talk about juicing.  Is it good? Is it bad? If you know Matt, you know nothing gets so perfunctory and simplified a treatment.

In the post, he talks about how and when juicing can be beneficial, the possible dangers, and how to go about incorporating it into your life if you’re inspired to. It’s a great primer, especially in light of the recent research and interest here about the role of fluids and their cellular concentration as it relates to the metabolism and feelings of well-being.  Matt’s working on an upcoming eBook on that topic, and this can hopefully “wet” your appetite some. (Wacka, wacka wacka).

Keep an eye out for more about that in the near future, and in the meanwhile, check out the Q & A here.

18 Comments

  1. About a year and a half ago my doctor recommended weekly juice and broth fasts for digestive issues. Needless to say after a few months of doing this, my health did not improve. All it really did was shut down essential bodily functions and push my body into crisis. I shudder to think where I would be if I didn’t find this site.

    Reply
    • Was that for digestive issues, or for getting rid of digestive issues? I assume when I hear someone talking about things for digestive problems it’s meant to cause them, not take them away. Hee hee.

      Reply
      • The doctor meant well, certainly she was better then the next one I went to who implied that I was sick because I didn’t take enough medication. I think it’s like a lot of treatments, it lessened the symptoms for a couple days and made the underlying problem worse.

        Reply
  2. So you’re saying the rush of adrenaline I get after subsisting on 200 daily ounces of kale juice augmented with pond water, ISN’T the sign of ultimate health and healing??? Back to the drawing board!

    Reply
  3. Ugh! This is a timely post for me. Still trying to get over the ick that my recent (a couple weeks in August) juice fast induced.

    Hubby and I decided to go back to something that worked for us ages ago. Juice fasting was a big part of our lives in the late 90s/ early 00s. Well, inspired by Joe Cross (Fat, Sick and Nearly Dead), the extra 100+ pounds I’m carrying, digestive issues, and our past success…off we went to juice fast land with stars in our eyes and a song in our hearts.

    NO BUENO!! I had a horrible time, and my digestion is still in tatters. I have the worst acid reflux I’ve ever had in my life, and can’t poo on my own no matter what I eat. Bad news, friends.

    Hubby did wonderfully well, and was very disappointed when I jumped ship. I tried to keep juicing for him so he could continue, but the cost of all that produce AND having to buy real food for me just wasn’t sustainable.

    I guess it’s true…you can’t go home again :(

    Reply
    • Oh! I should include that we were technically juice “feasting” because we were drinking at least a gallon of juice a day.

      Reply
  4. Matt,

    I would be very interested in hearing more about how you formed your opinions on which juices are good or bad for you. Being exposed to the juice world even a little brings up a solid drum-beat of the benefits of kale and wheatgrass, which you’re pooping all over pretty hard.

    Of course, conventional wisdom is often misguided, but you know me – show me the sources. Please. :) I can’t help it; geeking out is a necessary part of my learning curve.

    I recently bought an Omega juicer, and I’ve been having fun with it. So far the items I have juiced are mostly on your “good” list, but I’ve worked in kale too in limited quantities, so I was surprised by your opinions. First I’ve seen of that. (And (thankfully?) I haven’t gotten to wheatgrass or anything like that yet)

    I continue to use the grain mill, mixing fresh flour with white about 50/50. Sometimes I go straight white flour though when I think that’s what my body wants. It never wants 100% fresh brown flour.

    Reply
    • A little kale is fine. Most nutritionists get boners over kale because of its nutrient density. If you would like to read some stuff about iron overload Ray Peat has some decent stuff on it. The big problem with kale is the goitrogens in it. http://thyroid.about.com/b/2010/06/17/bok-choy-overdose-thyroid-goitrogen.htm Which are probably only a problem in large quantities, which is often exactly what happens when one goes on a juicing kick.

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      • Its extremely irritating for some people and can cause more GI problems than you had to start with.

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      • If I recall correctly, Ray Peat has mentioned that making kale broths occasionally for the mineral content is okay. It is not high on his list, but he does not object to it as long as you make a broth out of it(maybe it inactivates something in kale).

        Reply
  5. Not surprisingly, this reiterates that, as in all things, moderation is key and extremes are bad. Some juice in the diet=good. Lots of juice (juice fasts) = bad.

    Matt it’s interesting that you recommend drinking most water with meals, because in many schools of thought that is considered bad for digestion. I’m inclined to agree with those schools of thought, personally.

    Reply
    • I only say that because when you drink water by itself, and your metabolism sucks, it’s very depleting. I’m not saying one should drink water with meals. I’m saying that water is safer to drink when consumed with carbs and salt. In other words, eating food with water makes the water “not water.”

      Reply
  6. Well looky here, I did raw vegan for a couple of really interesting flatulent years. Got to the point where even digesting a simple green juice was impossible. fun times. In moderation, it’s ok and somewhat tasty. In excess, it’s a digestive nightmare designed to clear rooms and irritate the fuck out of your bowels. I do make shakes now and blend up some stuff but no more juice for me unless it’s OJ.
    xxoxoxoxoxo

    Reply
  7. I know I have a fluid consumption problem that is hindering my goals, and just the thought of juicing makes me turn into an iceberg…It’s gettin a tad bit chilly up here in Ohio, but really only in the morning to me anyway. People keep on sayin aren’t you cold? So I must be doin something right =P But I know I’m not as hot as I should be yet! and I’m still peein too much damnit. I feel like sipping on fluids to me is like holding in an orgasm, or worse than quiting smoking lol. But ALAS I will conquer my chugtastical dilemma someday!

    Reply
  8. I started doing lots of juicing when I when I decided to increase my raw food intake ..mainly though green smoothies…and getting all spiritual and goody goody in life.

    The result is that it messed up the ecosystem of my stomach leaving me very bloated and uncomfortable. I still have not fully recovered a few years later. I used to have a stomach like an ironing board. I used to also get very cold, and want to pee all the time.

    The positives when I juiced was a shiny smooth skin, and a very kind of clear headedness that I describe as not being able to achieve in any other way. So its not all neg.

    My feelings are that for some raw food may work…and very well. Others its a no no …unless you train the stomach to digest it over years ; and even so … we do not have multiple stomachs or long digestive systems adapted like grazing animals.

    Juicing does not break the food down completely even if you have a super mixer or what not. I am talking here of on a micro level. The body has to work so much harder to break down raw food even juiced.

    Any thoughts?

    Reply
  9. “The body has to work so much harder to break down raw food – even juiced.”

    Hence, the invention of cooking : )

    Reply
  10. How about V8 juices? Are those okay to drink? The juice is heated (cooked) and filled with sodium.

    Reply

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