Ray Peat Ideology and Philosophy

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I have already introduced one of Peat’s great quotes that illuminates a philosophy very near and dear to my heart – and I assume to the hearts of many of the readers of this blog who enjoy the pursuit of health as an exploration instead of a regurgitation or defense of a limited viewpoint.

“Once we accept that knowledge is tentative, and that we are probably going to improve our knowledge in important ways when we learn more about the world, we are less likely to reject new information that conflicts with our present ideas. The attitude of expectancy will allow us to apply insights gained at one level of generality to other levels. No particular kind of knowledge will have such authority that it will automatically exclude certain possibilities in another field of knowledge.”

He goes further with this concept in one of his books, highlighting a quote by Keith Jarrett…

“People expect beautiful melodies. But I already know the melodies. So does everybody else. Rather than look for more beautiful melodies, everyone’s purpose should be to find blind spots.”
~Keith Jarrett

And then Peat discusses it, weaving into the talk one of my most prominent personal beliefs – that when the work you do is meaningful and you are passionate about it, you don’t need distractions from it with mindless entertainment (except for 80′s movies). The worst possible life is having nothing meaningful to do at all – which is, often to their downfall when they do obtain it, the ideal of many hopeful retirees and worshipers of neo-liberal financial excesses. But overall the point of the following quote is very similar to the most prized advice that I offer to people in my personal life, which is to find out what you love to do more than anything in the world, and figure out how to support yourself doing it.

“Our present lives are usually divided between routine work and entertainment. The entertainment is supposed to enliven us, to help us recover from the deadening effects of routine work. Some people put great energy and concentration into their hobbies, because they find the activity intrinsically interesting. Such intrinsic value and interest is what should be demanded of our work. But for many people, free time is routinized too. To them, Jarrett’s suggestion sounds like nothing but hard work. This is where the whole person has been affected by a certain approach to work, and work is seen as something to avoid – the idle rich seem to have found the only satisfactory life.”

Nothing strikes a chord with me in terms of high-quality longevity, and maximizing the regenerative potential of your body and mind to keep growing and producing new tissues into old age more than this simple Peat quote…

“A person’s vitality is drawn forward by meaningful work, that is, we grow to meet the demands of an important opportunity.”

And I will openly admit that Peat’s great philosophy about life, health, science, and its pollution by commercial interests makes me take his work more seriously. After all, I share many of these sentiments, and can see with absolute clarity the joint efforts by industry, media, medical organizations, educational institutions, and even the health and fitness industry itself in the perpetuation of simple-minded theories, myths, blatant mis-information, and distractions.

“A scientific attitude is of great importance, but we must recognize that science has absolutely nothing to do with the ‘consensus of the authorities.’ You are less likely to do the wrong thing if you believe that ‘the authorities are always wrong,’ because then you will begin to question their assumptions, evaluate their evidence, and examine their reasoning.”


“When you start looking for ulterior motives, you might conclude that your physician is greedy, that your chemistry professor has a contract with the rubber company that makes ice cream, and that food producers are so pleased with their profits that they don’t care about the increasing numbers of deformed and mentally retarded babies, or the increasing rate of cancer and diabetes. If you do this, then you are probably involved in a demystification of the world. Eating good food can alter your consciousness; so can thinking about how we’re going to get it.”

Involved in a demystification of the world… Priceless.

And we all know Ray, who wrote many a book on women’s hormones, fertility, and health issues, loves the ladies, and Ladies Love Cool Ray (LL Cool Ray)…

“The ideas in this book have been described by some as the physiological side of women’s liberation, but of course there are political implications here too: why should we give privileged status to a profession which commits millions of unnecessary hysterectomies or which waits until the last quarter of the twentieth century to determine whether surgery is the best treatment for acute appendicitis (it isn’t), or to the drug companies which fabricate their ‘safety and effectiveness studies’ out of thin air, and then hire academic shills to promote their products, or to the food industry which adulterates and degrades our foods with the false excuse that this is required for economical mass distribution? Instead of giving them a privileged status, their criminal acts should be recognized and treated as such.”

Anyway, quotes like this don’t spill out from the mind of a pea-brained health guru with a relentless hard-on for self-promotion and no substance to back it up. Ray has put a very respectable amount of high-quality thought into the conclusions that he has come to in his cumulative experiences as a scientist, researcher, and health advisor. As well-educated and skeptical critics, we will move forward and discuss many of the stances he has come to take over the years…

…while also being immature jackasses that picture Ray, naked except for a large bejeweled sombrero, with a bowl of Jello, painting nude women. Speaking of which, if Grassfed Mom still has that creepy Peat quote about a penis being a “warm dream” that I sent you, please post it in the comments. It’s unbelievable.

Speaking of sombreros, you know Ray is clubbin’ tonight for Cinco de Mayo with that thing!
“Jello shots young college-aged, progesterone-filled, well-lubricated vixens!”

If you liked this article, you might also enjoy my eBook on how to  Raise Your Metabolism

91 Comments

  1. Stoner, nice shot at the neo-liberals . . . a hateful bunch indeed. looks like ray peat has good taste in music (keith jarret.)

    Reply
  2. You know LL Cool Ray is all vinyl baby.

    Reply
  3. "Speaking of which, if Grassfed Mom still has that creepy Peat quote about a penis being a “warm dream” that I sent you, please post it in the comments. It’s unbelievable."

    :D What? Please share that quote!

    Really nice post, Matt. I think the quotes that you chose describe Peat's attitude really well, and show what kind of guy he is.

    Reply
  4. Continuing on what you said about Peat and stress in the older comment thread. I don't think Peat is entirely against stress, if you read his article on autonomic systems

    http://raypeat.com/articles/other/autonomic-systems.shtml

    Its clear he believes that there must be a balance between parasympathetic and sympathetic activity, like implying that too much parasympathetic dominance can contribute to cancer, he also has some positive things to say about adrenaline in that article.

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  5. Is the quote about the well-lubricated vixens a joke or did Peaty really say that?

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  6. Matt, you wrote:
    "many of the readers of this blog … enjoy the pursuit of health as an exploration instead of a regurgitation or defense of a limited viewpoint. "

    Reminded me of my other favorite blogger, Ran Prieur, who I linked to several times before. This quote below from here: http://www.ranprieur.com/essays/GDT.html

    "Suppose I say that there are reports of living creatures found encased in rocks split open by miners. One was a toad that survived; another was a small pterodactyl-like creature that gasped a few breaths and died. Suppose I say that there are many reports, unknown to each other, of cities seen in the clouds, strange and fully detailed, or that there are dozens of reports of giant rotating pinwheels of light on the surface of the Indian Ocean.

    I present no argument for the validity of these reports. My point is, when you read about them, what is your habitual reaction? Probably it's to think of explanations that protect your existing mental models: The toad was behind the rock, not inside it. The cloud cities are reflections from atmospheric temperature inversions. The water wheels are just waves in water filled with luminescent plankton. UFO's are the star Sirius, which seems to change color when it's low in the sky. Rains of fishes were sucked up by a tornado over water. Go ahead — it's easy enough. But my point is, this way of thinking is not necessary. You have chosen it, or it has been chosen for you, and you have the power to choose otherwise.

    When I read these reports, my reaction is "Cool! Where can I read more? How can I use this stuff to break out of my present reality and into new ones?" Imagine you're in a stone-walled structure and you hear a report of a crack in the wall. What do you do? If you feel you're besieged in a fortress, you will go try to seal it up. If you feel you're locked in a prison, you will go try to open it wider. If you feel you're a keeper of slaves, you'll go try to seal it up. These are emotional decisions, or political decisions. They cannot be neutral."

    And Marc, I think the 'well-lubricated vixens' is a reference to the ability of progesterone (one of Peat's faves) to prevent vaginal dryness

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  7. Haha, I understand the reference. It's just hard for me to imagine that quote coming from the nice, mild-mannered old gentleman I heard on the EastWest podcasts.

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  8. I'm still reeling from the TXNIP post and now here is this awesome look into the mind of Ray Peat.

    (Unzips pants and pulls out ice cream cone)

    THREE THUMBS UP!

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  9. Charles, that was amazing- thank you. :-)

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  10. Love his mindset, very similar to my own. I believe very strongly in having a driving purpose in life, and NOT retiring completely. Always having something that drives you.

    Charles, that was pure awesomeness.
    "Three thumbs up!" LOL

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  11. "nice, mild-mannered old gentleman"… or badass

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  12. What fun is it being "cool" if you can't wear a sombrero?

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  13. Definitely 3 thumbs up for Charles. Unbelievable.

    Marc-

    Come on man. I appreciate any help spreading rumors that he actually said that though.

    Rob-

    Thanks for that. Thinking outside of the box is tricky. And those that think outside the box have a really hard time thinking back into the box when valuable knowledge is in the box.

    Mental flexibility is always easier said than done. Peat is a great example of that. He seems to want more mental flexibility than he actually has – as Rosenfelt I'm sure will chime in and tell us any moment now (while procrastinating from his "studies").

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  14. Collden-

    Thanks for that. That is my view as well. You can have too much parasympathetic or too much sympathetic. You can be imbalanced on either end of the spectrum.

    Your intermittent fasting experience post-RRARF is a good case in point. If you would have tried that prior to RRARFing it might have been a disaster.

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  15. Yep too both of Michael's points — having a driving passion/purpose in life AND the awesomeness of the THREE THUMBS UP! lol!

    That was a sweeet one, Mr. Peden! Thanks! :-)

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  16. That was a good post, Matt. Liked it a lot. I think that ultimately it is not unlikely that we suffer not only on an emotional level from an uninspiring life but also physically. These days I feel a bit like I have come full circle because all the intuitive eating stuff reminds me of my old heroine Shakti Gawain who has always held that attitude towards food (and a lot of other things). Maybe she was not as wacky as I thought her to be when I started thinking that science had all the answers…

    PS: I know it's off topic but I had to share this reading all the ice cream cone references: http://www.happehtheory.com/2010/07/29/masturbation-effects-on-the-human-body-11-23-08/

    The best thing about it is the ending: "Any of you that masturbate a lot with your right hand, can look forward to your body changing like this man’s body has changed."

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  17. Keith Jarrett makes very weird noises when he plays. Sounds like he's having a Ray peat style "good time" nix jello.

    If I hear one more "meaningful" quote, I'm gonna unleash my "passion in life" all over the floor. Can only take so much philosophical hoo-hah in a day.

    "Speaking of sombreros, you know Ray is clubbin’ tonight for Cinco de Mayo with that thing!
    “Jello shots young college-aged, progesterone-filled, well-lubricated vixens!”

    If you liked this article, you might also enjoy my free eBook on How to Raise Your Metabolism"

    Nice timing on the plug, lol

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  18. I picture Ray like the Buffalo Bill guy on Silence of the lambs who keeps his patients in a well in his basement and makes them rub lotion on their skin (except in stead of lotion of course he gives them a mixture of coconut oil and cooked potato juice). no disrespect Ray.

    but anyway this may be the best post ever, I agree with everything that was said and its freakin hilarious at the same time

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  19. Nah Matt, I'm done ranting, I'll be a good boy now

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  20. CM… wtf!!

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  21. rosenfeltc wrote…
    "Nah Matt, I'm done ranting, I'll be a good boy now"

    That made me laugh :-)

    Matt, you have them all under your spell now lol! I loved this blogpost — I'm sure you're not surprised :-)
    Thanks for giving us a glimpse into the passionate side of the hu*man* that is Ray Peat.

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  22. Matt, It would be great if you could interview Ray. Would love it if you could have a discussion with him on the things you disagree on, then we could hear both sides of the story and try to make an informed decision as to who is right.

    I know you mentioned somewhere that his interviews are awkward but maybe you could do it by way of a backwards and forwards written article or something.

    Although an audio would be awesome because I find (not sure if it is just me)that if I listen to something over and over it seems to sink in and I understand it better. Plus you can send a podcast to a portable device and carry on with life, without being tied reading something on the computer.

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  23. Well it would have been both disturbing and awesome if Peat actually said that. It does sound much more like a Matt Stone quote than a Ray Peat quote, but I just had to make sure. ;)

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  24. All I've ever heard of Ray is that he likes sugar, painting naked women, and has followers even more obsessed than us. Those were some pretty awesome quotes. He seems pretty cool. I may just have to whoop his ass.

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  25. I love that so far this is none about food. Really feel like I'm in the right company too with the talk about finding and pursuing your passion, and of seeing what you believe rather than vice versa.

    I'd totally believe in the pterodactyl and toad story–and I get labeled gullible. I was talking to a friend recently about diet and exercise and said that overexercising can reduce your metabolic rate. He thought I was an absolute idiot in that moment and dismissed me with 'it's scientifically proven' that exercising raises metabolic rate, the more the better. I don't know how to hold these conversations.

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  26. I'm flattered! So flattered, in fact, that I'm gonna sue your ass for using my precious naked woman painting without my permission. And on top of that, I'm gonna write a very complex, so complex that it is behooving and impossible to read or understand article criticizing your from a scientific and unbiased perspective in a unique and yet to be approached manner, in a way that is different from all others and beyond the average thought process, and of a different level of thought patterns and reasoning, above the standard reference of intellectual construism, at the peak of the mountain of omnipotent savante wisdomic fervor! Hmph!

    セックスはセックスのたわごとのたわごとは気いまいましいいまいましいたわごとがセックスをしている!

    こん畜生! Oh my! I better take some jello shots and calm down. Where's a low-fat ice cream cone when you need it?! Huff…puff….huff….puff….

    And for your information, a penis is a warm dream! Ooooooooooooh…….

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  27. Matt,

    Perhaps you can ask Ray about his latest interview with Eastwest healing…specifically his comment explaining to the Rubins that the obesity epidemic is due to an increase in calories over the past 50 years (specifically, calories from starch).

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  28. Chris ! Chris ! Ole ole !!
    Matt ! Matt ! Ole ole !!

    Why worry about health and diet when you can party?

    I wonder…

    Martin V.

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  29. Too bad Danny didn't know about this before. Peat's even got a great way to grow hair from balding. Just stick your head in a fireplace.

    "Some types of injury or irritation can activate regenerative processes. A dermatology journal described the case of an old man who had been bald for many years who fell head-first into his fireplace. As his burned scalp healed, new hair grew. In the U.S., experimenters (Ito, et al., 2007) have found that injuring the skin of mice stimulates the formation of stem cells that are able to become hair follicle cells, supporting the regeneration of cells that had been absent. A brief exposure to estrogen, and other stress related signals (nitric oxide, endorphin, prostaglandins) can initiate stem cell proliferation."

    http://raypeat.com/articles/articles/stemcells.shtml

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  30. I second that Matt, it would be awesome if you interviewed Peat. So awesome… I would love to hear what we has to say about all the possible holes in his work. But please first give us a notice so that we can send you questions to ask him.

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  31. Mark

    I don't rember him saying that starch was necessarily the cause of obesity in that interview. It wouldn't surprise me, though, that it had something to do with it given the sources that starch comes from.

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  32. el66k,

    It's buried deep in the April 27th 2 hour broadcast. It's around the time he discusses Lustig's sugar-bashing presentation. Perhaps around the 1 hour mark. The Rubins ask him about obesity and he dismisses sugar as a cause, and blames increased calories consumed, most notably from starch. Peat is anti-grain. Heck…he's even anti-banana!! (due to its high starch content) He likes potatoes in moderation.

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  33. So-crates!! Love it. Just watched Bill & Ted last week.

    I also think that enjoying one's work such that it is no longer work can make all the difference.

    I thought about trying to make some Jello shots, too. Maybe I need to get myself a nice big jeweled sombrero for when I rip out my basement carpet so I can start painting again.

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  34. Matt, I like these quotes. Which books/articles/interviews are they from?

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  35. Ok per Matt's request I went back through all the wacky messages I sent him and found the Peaty pearl of penis wisdom, some may even say, poetry;'
    "The penis is the male animal-flower, a soft-firm dildo, a warm dream."

    You will never be the same again nor will you be able to listen to Peaty without that image in your evil head ;-)
    Love the frozen hag xo

    Reply
    • Honestly — you are indiscreet enough to post a private message here but don’t even dare to write the message from you which prompted it?
      Boy, sometimes I wonder why RP bothers with us.
      Is it really that hilarious to talk in a poetic way about a penis? Why? Do you find it funny if you read poetic exclamations about the heart? Or the hand? Or even woman’s breast?
      Reading this made me feel bad. Made me feel like Ray Peat was betrayed after all his kindness.

      Reply
  36. "The penis is the male animal-flower, a soft-firm dildo, a warm dream."

    He said it with such passion. Can't sound any gayer.

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  37. In what kind of context would a man say that kind of stuff??

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  38. "The penis is the male animal-flower, a soft-firm dildo, a warm dream."

    THis quote is great. Gives a new ring to the expression: "Darling, I brought you some flowers!" Better not to say it on Mother's Day, though.

    @Ela: I know that feeling. A couple of days ago I talked to my Dad about weight gain. His attitude is towards managing your weight is simple: eat less, exercise more. I tried to explain to him that the body is a little more complex than a car but it was useless. To him, being healthy can only be achieved by punishing yourself. I pointed out to him that this is not a sustainable approach. He readily admitted that he had not only lost his entire body weight twice in this life (not in one go) and had regained it but refused to go the rest of the way. "I don't care about science", was all he said. Frustrating.

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  39. myleftarmpit,
    I think it is important to show a person the immediate effects nutrition can have. I have to friends who used to think exactely like your dad. Now they are very interested in nutrition and very aware of the physilogical effects different foods have on mind and body.
    One of them got rid of her acne after I persuaded her to completely avoid gluten for a some time. The other one felt very sluggish all the time and told me couldn't get anything done. He was convinced that nutrition can be very important, when he felt very happy and energized for a few hours after he had had coconut oil with his dinner

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  40. I think Peats stuff works for people cause he really deemphasizes grains and human tummies dont like grains. Don't do grains ummkay, cause uh grains are bad ummkay.

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  41. @ Rob A:

    Wow, I can't believe you read Ran's site! He's my all-time fave blogger, no questions

    His writings helped me feel comfortable with going against the grain and with what I believe.

    Wow. Wow.

    Ian2.

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  42. Hi , Matt.

    Besides 80's movies ,don't forget
    80's music too LOL ! :)

    Take care,

    Raz

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  43. Hey Ian2,

    Awesome! My favorite too. When I first got to him several years ago, I had four or five moments where my head got cracked open by some new crazy idea or insight of his. And I remember thinking that I hadn't had that many crack my head open moments in 16+ years of college.

    And Ela,
    I would be inclined to believe it too these days, though initially I would have tried to dismiss it. I too fall prey to easy gullibility at times- I just want the world to be more exciting. One trick I've found in flexing my skepticism: would accepting this new idea tend to strengthen centralized control or undermine it? If strengthen, I more quickly pull out the skeptic flag.

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  44. whoops- 16+ years of school altogether, not just college. :-D

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  45. Thanks, Jannis. I appreciate your response. I am just not very hopeful. Who am I to talk about nutrition anyway? I have learnt a lot about it in the last year but I still don't know enough or can explain it very well. Plus: I have become more confident about my body and don't feel as upset about my flab as I used. But I am also borderline obese now (BMI closing in on 30) which I wasn't when I did not care too much about nutrition science. So although I think I know a lot more about it then I used to I am not a picturebook example of someone who really knows his stuff. Hence the scepticism I meet when I tell people what I think about how the body works. It's just not very convincing coming from someone who is fat and who is always hungry. (Actually it is not hunger I feel it's like something isn't right with my stomache in spite of just having eaten and only eating more will alleviate that feeling.) Superficially, the "eat less, exercise more" advice just fits me so perfectly (and my protesting that I have tried it and failed at it is just ignored as the attitude of someone who likes being a victim).

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  46. In honor of gay Ray May, I bought some Häagen Dazs last night. I got the vanilla bean "five" (the number of ingredients). I gobbled up a pint of it and it didn't phase me. ~700 calories like breathing in air. Is that the right kind or should I go with the butter pecan next time? I ain't scared.

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  47. @johnny lawrence I hope you do track Ray Peat down like a dog, do a leg sweep on him and force him to make you jello shots. Then you will kiss as the sun goes down, sort of a warm dream if you will :)

    @leftpit I do that too, eat something then feel 'not quite right' and think eating something ELSE will make it better.. wonder what that is exactly? I think it best to not eat when that happens, perhaps have some hot tea or fruit juice?

    Everyone: It's Friday Bitches!
    hag xo

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  48. Ray Peat (the real one lol!) said:
    "The penis is the male animal-flower, a soft-firm dildo, a warm dream."

    Wow, he really knows how to charm the ladies, right? :-)
    Male animal-flower??

    Raz wrote:
    "Besides 80's movies, don't forget
    80's music too LOL ! :)"

    I second that :-)

    Johnny wrote:
    "I ain't scared."

    Cracked me up!! Thanks, Johnny :-)

    Grass Fed Momma wrote:
    "Everyone: It's Friday Bitches!"

    Thank you too, Deb! :-)

    Okay, that's all. I'm gonna go play now!!

    Reply
    • I agree … ‘the male animal flower’ … that’s so beautiful. If any man would say to me instead of the incredibly stupid ‘you must be an angel’-crap we usually get, I think I’d instantly marry him. Well – he’d have to be half as smart as Ray Peat, too. That would be more than enough for me.

      Reply
  49. @grassfedmomma: I have wondered whether it might be hypoglycemia. It's not only the weird feeling in the stomache. I have tried the ignoring it but it won't go away from that and then I get all kinds of weird sensations in my body. Like feeling weak and dizzy.

    But that won't keep me from enjoying a Friday night! Have a fun night, too!

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  50. C'mon! Next article already! It's May 6 already and I haven't learned s***e about ray peat's research!

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  51. Although my diet falls more in line with someone like Stephan, I don't think anyone moreso than Ray has sparked as many new thoughts for me. Following up on all his references (formal and informal) is quite a journey, especially those non-related to nutrition–see Mind and Tissue.

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  52. Ray makes this quite extraordinary claim that essential fatty acids are not really essential (??) (I don't wanna steal matt's thunder here, he will get into that probably) and Ray says that we should drop our PUFA intake to the point where we're producing mead acid. But how much (how little) EFA do you need to prevent the production of mead acid. it's just a bit hard to imagine, cause if you're eating the Food, you're probably getting some EFAs. Ray doesn't seem to follow a fat-free diet, so won't the EFAs sneak in from cheese and butter etc. that he consumes??

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  53. seriously, the hackers with the weird profile names are starting to freak me out.

    but i'm getting as impatient as IM Patient–show me the money!

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  54. "Many people see coconut oil in its hard, white state, and–as a result of their training watching television or going to medical school–associate it with the cholesterol-rich plaques in blood vessels. Those lesions in blood vessels are caused mostly by lipid peroxidation of unsaturated fats, and relate to stress, because adrenaline liberates fats from storage, and the lining of blood vessels is exposed to high concentrations of the blood-borne material. In the body, incidentally, the oil can't exist as a solid, since it liquefies at 76 degrees. (Incidentally, the viscosity of complex materials isn't a simple matter of averaging the viscosity of its component materials; cholesterol and saturated fats sometimes lower the viscosity of cell components.) "

    I read this quote about coconut oil from one of gay Ray's articles. I had always thought the same thing about why the mainstream health authorities assumes that fat looks the same in the body as it does at room temperature. Maybe he's smarter than I thought.

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  55. More from Ray:

    Not all fruits, of course, are perfectly safe–avocados, for example, contain so much unsaturated fat that they can be carcinogenic and hepatotoxic.

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  56. Ray seems to have a paranoid aversion against everything that has double-bonds

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  57. Give it up for Ray:

    Fructose inhibits the stimulation of insulin by glucose, so this means that eating ordinary sugar, sucrose (a disaccharide, consisting of glucose and fructose), in place of starch, will reduce the tendency to store fat. Eating “complex carbohydrates,” rather than sugars, is a reasonable way to promote obesity.

    All I ate for 8 friggin months was starch and didn't gain a pound, with no exercise. Me = 1 Ray = 0

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  58. doesn't disprove his point, Ray claims that it's damn hard to get fat on tons of sugar

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  59. Ok, maybe I am older than everyone here? All this "Gay Ray" etc…..is getting on my nerves.

    Is there any one of you that would enjoy your reputation being turned into a crude joke?

    It seems everyone here wants to learn from Ray. So why not show some respect?

    I take the time to read commments hoping to learn from each of you.
    What have I learned today?

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  60. Johnny, I'm the other side of the coin. Eating starch for months on end made me put on weight, cutting out starch and having fruit, juice, dairy and small amounts of sucrose has made me lose weight and improve my digestion greatly.

    I guess it's different strokes for different folks :)

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  61. Peat quote:

    "Not all fruits, of course, are perfectly safe–avocados, for example, contain so much unsaturated fat that they can be carcinogenic and hepatotoxic."

    NAFLD from eating avocados??!!!?? anyone??????

    I hope 2012 will be the end of it all.
    Until then… let´s eat some air, (delicious with some gelatin).

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  62. Comment eaten! Son of a!!!!

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  63. Do you mean you guys cant just hit the back button and the comment will still be there in the text field?

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  64. Comments are PUFA rich and can cause your thoughts to disappear . Ray Peat endorsed this inane comment.

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  65. I've eaten ice cream the last two nights and afterwards feel like I could drink a friggin gallon of water. I never get that thirsty any other time unless I'm totally parched in the middle of summer. It also gives me terrible gas. I think that the lactose decreased skim milk that's in it may be the problem because I never have trouble with dairy.

    On fruit, I skipped it yesterday morning for my normal meal and ate starch instead. I felt like a sloth all day. No energy whatsoever. Ate my usual Johnny sized bananas with grape and pineapple juice and have had some of the best roundhouse and spinning jump kicks in a while. I'm an endomorph type person that can sit all day long and be just fine doing nothing. Eating fruit at least turns me into a normal person that wants to wash dishes or maybe walk to the mailbox.

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  66. Johnny L
    For research purpose please post a picture of a 'Johnny size banana '. ;-)

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  67. Fruit is a chore for me to eat enough to be anything meaningful and doesn't make me feel good like a lot of you say it does for you. It also makes me really hungry soon after. However, yesterday I had about a liter of orange juice and felt pretty good so I don't really know what to think about that.

    also, NEXT ENTRY PLEASE, MATT

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  68. well, it isnt that easy to translate ray's work to a more understandable language

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  69. Thank you team smith. I try to aim for variety!

    But what do I know. I'm just the 800 lb. gorilla in the room.

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  70. grok on!

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  71. Teach me Ray, teach me:

    "Restricting only tryptophan, or only cysteine, produces a greater extension of the life span than achieved in most of the studies of caloric restriction. How great would be the life-span extension if both tryptophan and cysteine were restricted at the same time?"

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  72. Thanks Michael! Now I'll nothing to do for the next month of my over-carbed, over-rested life. Everyone, give a round of applause to Michael for spoiling gay ray may on the seventh day in the most untimely way.

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  73. Mmkay.

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  74. LOL, I aim to please. But I hope you were going to do your own interpretation of his findings. Not just post up a couple links. ;-)

    Besides, we want it full of Matt Stone's legendary wit, humor and a few good 80's references.

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  75. Nice one Michael, thanks. Also do you or anyone else know how to get a picture to show up? I have a google username and a picture uploaded but mine doesn't show a thumbnail image like yours, Matt's, GFM, and others.

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  76. please post the fruit list Michael, if you don't mind.

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  77. Take a look at this beauty:

    Since excess tryptophan is known to produce muscle pain, myositis, even muscular dystrophy, gelatin is an appropriate food for helping to correct those problems, simply because of its lack of tryptophan. (Again, the popular nutritional idea of amino acids as simply building blocks for tissues is exactly wrong–muscle protein can exacerbate muscle disease.) All of the conditions involving excess prolactin, serotonin, and cortisol (autism, postpartum and premenstrual problems, Cushing's disease, "diabetes," impotence, etc.) should benefit from reduced consumption of tryptophan. But the specifically antiinflammatory amino acids in gelatin also antagonize the excitatory effects of the tryptophan-serotonin-estrogen- prolactin system.

    And they say eat all the meat you want when you're "diabetic". I'm ready for some gelatin. I have never eaten it, at least not on purpose. What is it? Where do I get it? Boil some beef bones (for less than 3 hours) and drink? Where the crap is Janice when you need him.

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  78. Oh, by the way, I'm working today and have been for the past 2 weeks, 12HEDUTTOMICU (12 hours every day until this tornado mess is cleaned up). It's just a normal friggin day to me while all of you are enjoying your Saturday off! I'll just keep quoting Peaty and talking to myself! Thanks! I'm starting to like him. I'm already thinking about my ice cream I get to eat tonight at 7:26 when I get home. And crop dusting my wife.

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  79. "And crop dusting my wife."

    LMAO (laughing my ass off) @ Johnny!!

    Keep talking to yourself Johnny – very entertaining :-)

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  80. I just now had a freagin revelation! My fellow 12'er Tim and I were just now discussing his arthritis, my shoulder pain, gelatin, muscle meats, and wussy crane kicks. He said "my mom makes chicken & dumplins with the whole chicken" and I thought, bingo baby! That's the way my wife's mom makes it! Gelatin rich! That's what I ate that same weekend when my shoulder pain subsided for a few days! Where can I buy some gelatin at 7:00 at night?

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  81. @Johnny Lawrence

    Go to a grocery store and look for unflavored gelatin near the jello/dessert section. It will be dry, so you want to dissolve it in water first.

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  82. same process as making jello, but more water.

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  83. Thanks anyn, got it! I've never made jello. I'll get it in me some way.

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  84. I meant anon, sorry. I'm terrible with names.

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  85. Andrew Ford, the quotes about work are from Peat's book "Generative Energy" – chapter 18, The Traditions of Truth.

    I have all of his books, but I haven't found the source of the other quotes yet.

    Perhaps Matt will post them. He should! :)

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  86. I didn't find the penis flower quote creepy in context – he was making a poetic point.

    It's in "Nutrition for Women" (which, by the way, contains dietary advice that in some ways differs from what he recommends now. The book is old!)

    I like the points he makes when I observe how things are going today, years after he wrote what I copied below, because I see that many 'modern' women behave atrociously toward men and get away with it with the pretense of being liberated, rivaling the men they speak out against in terms of dominant behaviour. I'll bet excess estrogen is a contributor, making things far worse.

    But he was writing the below years ago, and women aren't so worried any more, many of them are taking over the former male power position that they claim they abhor.

    "Men, out of touch with their energies and natural desires and dreams, have kept women in chains. Passive and weak, women have kept to themselves the wholeness and richness of their experience.

    Reasoning and competing men have believed that they possessed women, but the centered and prolific human female world was overlooked by the greedy devouring male, who took part of her existance and believed he had taken it all.

    Wishing to be liberated, no longer passive and weak, many women are becoming reasoning competitors, but in doing so they are losing contact with their bodily energies, desires and dreams.

    It's obviously hard to desire the kind of man who has produced, and been produced by, western civilization. He is the competitive athlete or the competitive sedentary business man, or the competitive intellectual rationalizing his superiority over all beings.

    Sexual desire has been so closely involved with enslavement, many women feel very concretely that desire must be overcome if they are to gain full human status.

    Being a sexual object has meant being enslaved and diminished.

    Gaining the social, economic, cultural, intellectual and sexual rights of men will not liberate anyone, because these rights and roles are where the ugliness of maleness is. It is not the penis that is fascistic, domineering, exploitive, corrupting. The penis is the male animal-flower, a soft-firm dildo, a warm dream.

    All objects are desirable, no object enslaves, imposed systems enslave.

    If we see that to be an animal, to be human, is to desire, then we see that to be understood is to be understood as desire. If our perception is purified, there is no mere object.

    In a society which considers a corporation to be a person, we have to be careful when we ask to be treated as "a person, not an object". The society's definition of a person is something like "an emptiness with rights". We want equal rights, but we also want equal fullness. To acheive that human fullness, men have to be freed from their abstract reasoning aggressive possessiveness, and women have to be freed from their passivity".

    It goes on, but that's most of it.

    It was written before the copy of the book most people have was first written, I'm guessing. It sounds very early 70s to me.

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  87. “Men, out of touch with their energies and natural desires and dreams, have kept women in chains.”

    Actually, since rape and other actions resulting in female oppression have been observed in other male apes, I don’t think you can blame it on men being out of touch with their energies and natural desires and dreams.

    “Gaining the social, economic, cultural, intellectual and sexual rights of men will not liberate anyone, because these rights and roles are where the ugliness of maleness is. It is not the penis that is fascistic, domineering, exploitive, corrupting. The penis is the male animal-flower, a soft-firm dildo, a warm dream.

    All objects are desirable, no object enslaves, imposed systems enslave.”

    Yes, it’s The System that rapes, tortures, bullies, and terrorizes women into oppression. So it’s The System’s fault, and individual men are not responsible for their actions. You may now return to your warm dream.

    Reply

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