Stress and Metabolism Webinar

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By Matt Stone

Lianda Ludwig – some of you who participate on the 180D facebook page might recognize her name, has stuck with some of the basic principles of this site for quite a while.  It was tough going at first.  It’s hard to eat enough food to raise your metabolism and function well when it just sits there like a friggin’ rock.  But eventually her metabolism rose, her health returned, her gastroparesis vanished, and her body fat levels reached their peak and have now started slowly falling.  This is always nice to hear, but even nicer to know that a woman over 60 years of age can even pull it off successfully.

Anyway, she has a lot of lessons from this experience to share and is hosting a webinar on stress, metabolism, weight and more tomorrow at 4pm eastern/1pm pacific time.  I thought some of you might want to know about it. You can sign up for it free HERE.  Note, this is not a paid endorsement or anything like that.  I just happen to like Lianda and think many of you can benefit from hearing some of the themes here repeated and expanded upon by someone other than a young, crude, male punk like me.  Over the years a lot of older women and men have voiced their skepticism about the effectiveness of refeeding for older people.  Lianda is living proof that you don’t have to be young or a male to improve the way your body functions in many areas with a surplus of sugar, starch, salt, and sleep.  In fact, with muscle and bone loss, slowed digestion, reduced metabolic rate, and other things being the hallmarks of impending doom when it comes to aging, it makes a lot MORE sense to eat anabolically the older you get.

I’m sure she will go well beyond that though, as I know stress and self-image and the power of our minds over our physiology is a big core belief for her. I hope you enjoy it.

30 Comments

  1. Yahoo! Finally someone with experience increasing their metabolism who is over 60! I wondered if it was possible. Can’t wait to hear the webinar.

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    • Yes everyone, it will be recorded. Make sure you register, and I’ll send you the replay information along with the special report. Thanks for your interest – and mostly, thanks to Matt Stone for helping me!

      Reply
  2. Just found your site when Lianda shared this post and I’m happy to see you sharing her webinars–they’re packed with helpful info. Changing my own diet has made a tremendous difference in my body and my energy levels as well.

    Off to explore your site, looking forward to learning more.

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  3. I’m interested in this, but can’t be available during that 90 minute block. Will it be recorded as well?

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  4. Same here–won’t be home at that time unfortunately. Since I am 57 years old, her experience is really encouraging to me. Sure hope it will be recorded or transcripted.

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  5. I definitely believe refeeding is good for older people too. It is good for dogs as well. When I came home from college my dog was really sick and frail with obvious signs of Cushing’s. She had lost a ton of weight, collapsed often, peed in the house, was losing her hair, etc. She is a 17 year old beagle-Rottweiler mix so I figured it was just old age. She wouldn’t eat her dog food anymore. I decided to feed her some freezer burnt hamburger. She ate ‘people food’ just fine. It has been a few months since I started feeding her chicken, hamburger, expensive moist dog food and graham crackers. She is spoiled I know. It is like she went back in time 10 years. Her hair is growing back, her bladder control is back to normal, she has plenty of energy and is able to run again. She still has a bit of arthritis but rarely collapses these days. She is a completely different animal. If refeeding reverse-aged my dog it certainly could do the same for my grandmother. Calories really are wonderful.

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    • Yeah I got to experience the power of this one time as well. My ex and I had to babysit an old black lab for her boss a few years ago. The owners kept telling us it was quite alright if the dog died while they were out of town. “Don’t feel bad if…”

      The thing was a total slug. Could barely get up. I practically had that thing doing backflips with his coat all shiny by the time the owners came home. They asked “what did you do?”

      I was giving him whole sticks of butter and pouring warm beef tallow all over his food. I gave him raw eggs like a half dozen at a time. I gave him tons of fish oil at the time too, mostly because I had it and hated it!

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      • I have made people biscuits with beef tallow, but I didn’t think to make doggie treats with them. Thats a brilliant idea.

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      • This is great to hear about the doggies. I feed my Lab mix people food all the time (or she counter-surfs for it) and I feel really guilty thinking it is bad for her. She eats a lot of home-made bread, meat scraps, whatever. She is a bit overweight but otherwise really healthy. I try to give her raw liver when I am able to buy it, and raw eggs a few times a week.

        I also give her raw beef bones (with meat hanging off them) almost every day, so she stays in the yard chewing on them instead of running out the gate when I open it to leave for work. The vet was amazed by how good her teeth look. (Of course when I told him about the raw bones he read me the riot act.)

        A note of caution though: I once let her lick up a pan full of bacon grease. I mean a lot of grease, maybe 1/2 cup of it. She was sick for weeks after and had trouble digesting her food- I think it was hard on her gallbladder?

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      • I did a rrarf with my dog almost 9 months ago. She had arthritis and a bladder infection that would not clear up. She got a little pudgy, but has started to slim down on her own. I actually have to give her organ meat or some fat to get her appetite going now, or else she won’t eat and her stomach makes terrible noises. Her coat looks amazing, her arthritis is gone and the infection cleared up. I feed her lamb and rice meal, because it works with my financial constraints and lifestyle. I have found with both the dogs I care for that too much gizzard meat will cause wheezing oddly enough. I am cautious not to give her too much fatty food in a single meal, I have found that too wide a variation of the macronutrient composition is difficult for her to digest. My main difficulty with her now that she is weight loss mode is that she wants to eat grass and puke every morning.

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        • Organ meats from pigs and chickens in particular is really high in AA, known to trigger asthma and increase the inflammatory response to pretty much anything. So that’s an interesting gizzard observation for sure.

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      • Great stuff but wanted to grow a warning in here for readers that feeding a dog a big meal with lots of fat can cause pancreatitis. My grandmothers dog got pancreatitis from thanksgiving leftovers.

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        • I think it’s pork fat, specifically, that is bad for them. Lots of sick dogs around thanksgiving/christmas

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          • Lots of fat and salt together gets their system all soapy inside

        • Good call. I had the “it’s okay if it dies” blessing and it wasn’t my dog so I was pretty careless about what and how much I fed it.

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          • The most important thing I learned about a rrarf diet with a dog is to slowly increase the amount of food over a few days and to get to a point where the dog self-regulates intake after maybe a week. I also have to take some measure of control in her dietary intake because so many of her other feedback mechanisms are controlled by my habits (length of walks, sleeping times, food supply, ect.)

        • yes I meant pancreatitis in my post above, not gallbladder, drrr. It was stupid for sure to let her have that much bacon grease. I have stopped eating pork since then so it won’t happen again.

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    • My friends think I’m nuts for feeding my dogs the way I do, but ever since I read that commercial dog foods can contain sawdust and chicken poop, I said no more. Yes, it costs more to feed them people food, but I’ve never had to take them to the vet. Their coats are scary shiny, their eyes are crystal clear and they are happy, playful dogs. My friend has her dog at the vet 2 or 3 times a year (at about $600 a visit) and I keep telling her real food will make a difference, but all she does is moan that it would cost too much to feed her dog real food. She can’t wrap her head around the fact that it sure as shit wouldn’t cost her the $1800 a year she is paying now in vet visits. And she thinks I’m a loon because my dogs eat so much saturated fat because her vet has her dog on an extremely low fat diet. No wonder the poor thing won’t play anymore (her dog is only 7). I told her wild dogs will take down an animal and eat all the organs before -and even if they do- touch the muscle meat. Dogs are meant to eat saturated fat.

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      • Susan, what do you feed your dog exactly?

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        • Hi Amy! The usual staple is cooked ground beef, rice, peas and carrots with a daily dollop of pumpkin. At nite they get the same thing, but I minus the pumpkin and give them a big spoon of whole fat yogurt. (Due to a period of unemployment, I still have to buy crappy corn fed beef for them, but things are looking better and I hope soon to go grass fed for their meals. But still, crappy beef is probably better than bagged food. I’m also hoping to get them off rice soon since I read about the arsenic thing in rice and read that humans decided dogs should eat grains, not dogs. They really only need meat.)

          I am able to buy grass-fed liver so I buy a container of that for 3 bucks chop it up and give them some (raw) in their morning meal with the ground beef. I also, depending on the family’s menu for the week, will give them raw and cooked chicken in place of the ground beef to change things up. The mornings I don’t have any liver to add to their breakfast, I will add raw egg yolks or a big scoop of bacon fat.

          I’ve read some people will go to their butcher and ask for scraps of any meat or even left over organs in order to keep costs down. I don’t have a real butcher at my town, just some schmo at the grocery store wearing a paper hat. I asked him for scraps and/or organs and he looked at me like I have 3 eyes. He explained that meat departments in grocery stores pretty much don’t cut meat anymore; it comes pre-cut in a box and they wrap it. So if you have a real meat shop near you I’ve read most butchers are thrilled to give you bits. pieces and organs and often won’t even charge you for it.

          If you’ve never fed your dogs an exclusive diet of real food, you will be amazed in about a week you will begin to see such changes in them! Especially with their breath. Yes, it still stinks, but it won’t smell rotten anymore. Also be prepared -cause nobody told me- for the “great shed out.” About a month into it, don’t be surprised if your dog starts shedding -a lot. Don’t let it alarm you, its a good thing. Soon, their old course hair will be replaced with the most silky and luxurious coat.

          Hope this helps and good luck!

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          • Thank you, Susan! I’m hoping to get a dog soon and would like to start it out on the right foot. This is really helpful!

          • Check out info on raw food diets. We feed our cats raw meat, organs and bones. My first cat that I fed this way had allergies so bad she pulled the hair out on her arms and belly. The raw food diet cleared it up. One of the cats we have now had the worst case of ear mites I’ve ever seen and it cleared up when ed switched him to raw food. I think there is a book called raw meaty bones about throw diets dogs should eat. The ratio of organ to meat is a bit different for dogs vs. Cats.

          • Sorry for the typos.

  6. Lianda has a big heart and cares about helping others. She is wealth of information and has so much to share.
    Thanks for telling your peeps about Lianda.
    ~Debra

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  7. Yes…same here, would love to hear it, but I will be at work. Hope it will be available for replay.

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  8. Matt, are you still following any of the RBTI principles? I know you have said that you stay away from pork mostly and pop a min-col every once in a while but are there any other Challenisms that you would consider especially helpful in repairing your metabolism or regaining your health?

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    • Mainly just avoiding the pork completely, and still tending to eat heavier early than later. That’s about it though. The biggest thing I got from RBTI was that urine concentration and metabolism are connected.

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  9. I just tried to listen to Linda’s “webinar” but as soon as the power point presentation got going the audio cut out. I am not only really disappointed about that but also that it led directly to a sales pitch.

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  10. Haven’t been able to find out how to listen to the recorded webinar.

    Reply

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