Posts Tagged: Asthma

A Post Nobody Will Read

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health and outdoor recreation

By Matt Stone Here we go again. Another one of those boring posts about outdoor recreation and health. If I’ve learned anything from blogging over the years, it’s that most people don’t give a flying rat’s ass about any connections between outdoor recreation and health. I mean, when I posted 10 Health Reasons to Spend Time Outdoors last summer, I sniffed my armpits trying to figure out why everyone immediately scattered the moment it went live. Do I offend? Yep, people want to hear about some magic supplement or diet that will enable them to sit around doing nothing, staring into the electronic devices they are fatally attracted to for endless hours, and avoid adventure and discomfort at all costs. Hell, on my last trip into the outdoors, it snowed… Read more »

The Sadder Side of Serotonin

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SerotoninSun

Are you sad?  Depressed?  Tired?  Crave them evil #$%#ohydrates?  Well hell son you just need you some serotonin!  Serotonin makes you happy!  Whee!!! The research and cultural status quo on serotonin doesn’t make much sense, and is full of contradiction.  Strangely, everyone seems to be madly in love with serotonin (people even have tattoos celebrating it – I hope they don’t read this post!) and is fully satisfied with the label of “happy juice.”  Serotonin makes you happy, everyone seems to believe, and if you aren’t happy then well, let’s figure out how to get more serotonin in ya.  Buck up little camper, we’ll beat that slump, together. When everyone in the media, in the health field, and beyond start to collectively believe in a very simple and narrow story about… Read more »

What Causes Allergies & Asthma

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Allergies to cats, dogs, dairy products, wheat, nuts, shellfish and other foods, pollen, fragrances, dust and so on are quite common.  Has it always been this common? No way. When it comes to asthma and allergies, there are generally more questions than answers. What causes allergies? What causes asthma? Are these developed or inherited disorders? What exactly is asthma? Asthma, an allergy-related condition is skyrocketing.  Has air-quality really gotten that bad?  What about in poor countries where air quality is even worse than it is in some of the wealthier nations? Actually, there is little correlation between air-quality and things like asthma and allergies.  In fact, in most cases the opposite is true.  Air quality, in general, is improving with tighter and tighter standards, but asthma, for example, has seen… Read more »

Inflammation Nation

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Inflammation Nation Ski Chilton

In the last post we talked about the stress response, and how it seems like the modern human body’s reaction to various stressors is overactive. This overactivation, many believe, is linked to the increasing presence of Arachidonic Acid in our bodies. Arachidonic acid is the precursor to what are known as Series 2 Prostaglandins, a class of predominantly pro-inflammatory (although not all) eicosanoids with undeniably close ties to dozens of inflammatory diseases that have risen with breathtaking rapidity over the course of the last century. But I think few understand just how much of an inflammatory tidal wave we’ve been hit with, and how it’s increasing at exponential speed. Incidence of asthma for example, has increased like 70-something percent in the last 15 years. Anyone who has kids these days… Read more »

Omega 6 Content of Common Foods

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omega 6 content of foods

By Matt Stone I’ve created quite a fuss lately about reducing the amount of omega 6 fatty acid in our diets. When I first came across information about increased tissue concentration of omega 6 fatty acids I had my doubts that it was really “so simple.” As I’ve learned with other systems of the body, it’s rarely a simple matter of “put x into the tank” and “y happens.” There are many variables involved in how two people process what they ingest, and the final outcome is unpredictable. But then David Brown nudged me about omega 6, mentioned that many of his own personal health problems have vanished since he made the minor adjustment of deleting peanut butter from his diet, and I listened to Dr. William Lands present on… Read more »

Omega 6, Cytokines, and the Cortisol Loop

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As we continue to explore the potential role that omega 6 fatty acid overload plays in the creation of the most major modern disease epidemics – such as asthma, allergies, autoimmune disease, obesity, and type 2 diabetes, it’s an appropriate time to closely examine one of Russ Farris’s Cortisol Schematics. Farris has been led to believe that the hormone cortisol, released in response to inflammation, is an important step in the chain of events leading to metabolic syndrome, heart disease, type 2 diabetes, and other chronic disease states.  I am more or less in full agreement, having entitled a chapter in my latest eBook on reversing type 2 diabetes “Cortisol is All.”  The inflammation connection was strengthened even more yesterday after I googled “inflammation causes leptin resistance” yesterday only to discover that… Read more »

Hypothyroidism

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It’s amazing to me how some of the most important realizations that I’ve come to over the past year have come from fragments of information obtained from some really misguided people. One of the biggest discoveries was differentiating between how complex starches and simple sugars affect the human body, shown to me by Terry Shintani, the author of a book touting an extremely low fat vegan diet. Through his work, he was able to show that complex starches leave sugar in the blood to be used as fuel, unlike simple sugars from fruit, cookies, breakfast cereals and the like, which causes insulin to rise higher than the level of blood sugar and induce hypoglycemia. This idea was further reinforced by Francine Kauffman of the American Diabetes Association, who discovered that… Read more »

Layla’s Pearly Whites

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“When we saw someone with really bright skin and shiny hair we used to assume that they were eating a lot of butter.”-Layla Sheikh’s remark watching me snarf up ridiculous amounts of butter Recently I crossed paths with a Somalian refugee living in political exile here in Maui. Her name is Layla Sheikh. But don’t think that she’s some poor peasant girl fresh outta the Somalian desert sand, begging for food. She sports a stylin’ fro and highly fashionable clothes. She cruises in an SUV, and has her own two-bedroom apartment 200 yards from the Pacific ocean. She works as a professional model, getting gigs like holding the round cards at the UFC fights over in Lahaina, as well as doing plenty of photo shoots and fashion shows. Basically, she’s… Read more »

Malabsorption

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First off, apologies to my long-time followers for always being so preoccupied with Weston A. Price and others that witnessed the sudden dramatic decline of health at the dawn of modern food. But the shift of human health really dominates my thinking. From the beginning I’ve really been perplexed and driven to understand how and what, specifically, brought about this shift. As a very brief recap for all the newbies, Price directly observed a dramatic change in physical, mental, and even societal health amongst several independent groups of humans worldwide, as they were exposed to modern foods for the first time from a previously natural, nutritious, and untainted diet. Highlights include improper formation of facial structure resulting in crooked teeth, something we now just consider to be normal and “genetic”… Read more »

The Crypt Keepers

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The first book on the topic of health and nutrition that I ever read was The Food Revolution by John Robbins. For those not familiar with ole’ Johnny boy, he is the son of the co-founder of Baskin-Robbins. He was inspired to write his first book, Diet for a New America, an edgy wad of ethical, environmental, and health reasons to go vegetarian, by growing up on a steady diet of ice cream and watching his family drop dead from massive, ice cream-induced heart attacks. Robbins was quick to jump on the government-sponsored idea that fats are bad, animal fats being the worst kind, and animal products in general are unhealthy. His books are filled with mountains of references to the ADA, AMA, AHA, and other acronyms synonymous with mainstream… Read more »

Hungry, Hungry Hippos

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The question I promised to answer in last week’s self-starvation experiment saga was “why are we so hungry if we’re eating more than ever before?” This is one of the biggest questions of the 21st century, and the correct answer may hold the key to unlocking the entire degenerative process that began at the dawn of carbohydrate refining. Most people agree that the cause of the Diabesity epidemic (a great term that I stumbled across, as the two, type II Diabetes and obesity, often go hand in hand) is eating too much and exercising too little. But as anyone who has read more than a few paragraphs of this blog knows, my opinions differ. I certainly see this ballooning phenomenon having far more complexity. It is clear that Americans, as… Read more »

Got Hyperinsulinism?

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Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas that is secreted to manage proper blood sugar levels. Blood sugar levels are extremely important. Too much sugar or too little sugar circulating through our bloodstream has an incredibly powerful – and harmful effect. Sugar balance is therefore of the utmost importance. Insulin is a storage hormone, meaning that it triggers the storage of sugar into the liver and the cells. Because of this property it is considered the key hormone involved in the accumulation of body fat. In fact, Type I diabetics that cannot produce insulin will literally waste away if insulin is not medically administered. Because carbohydrates, simple sugars in particular, have a pronounced effect on insulin in the body – causing a tremendous rise in the amount of insulin… Read more »

Status of the Puzzle

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It’s been a year now of concentrated research and tireless pondering on the current human health status, what constitutes an optimally healthy diet and lifestyle, and the best strategy for where to go from here if health interests you. To be able to come to some worthy conclusions, I had to make as much sense out of the endless sea of information as possible. This was no small feat, and the process of putting the pieces of the “puzzle” together is an ever-evolving process of refinement. But as we hit the end of 2007 and celebrate a full year of my self-righteous proclamations, it made sense to commemorate the current status of my overall understanding of the health trends that we’re seeing in the world. First of all, for all… Read more »

Let’s Get Physical

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Yes it pains me to steer away from my preoccupation with Britney and title something after an Olivia Newton John song, but hey, sometimes these things have to be done. This week’s topic is exercise, an essential piece of the total health experience. I’ve dabbled in many forms of exercise at varying intensity levels – ranging from 13-hour bike rides over mountain passes pulling a 50-pound trailer to 15-minute stretching sessions. What have I learned from all this? Well, a lot. Let’s discuss this intelligently shall we? Every nonhuman animal on the face of the earth has two primary goals for survival. The first goal is to eat as much as it can. When an animal is hungry and there is food present, it eats. It doesn’t have this complex… Read more »

WAPF 2007 Annual Conference (continued)

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In the last edition I talked about GAP Syndrome, a metabolic disorder rooted in the inner ecosystem of the digestive tract. GAP Syndrome, an imbalance with a myriad of physical and psychological disturbances, is quite treatable through a specific diet according to its “discoverer” Natasha Campbell-McBride. McBride’s best line during her two presentations at the conference was perhaps when she mentioned that the principles of Weston A. Price geeks was “a healthy diet for healthy people, but certain specific conditions require a very specific diet.” This is absolutely true and something we all needed to hear, for many conference attendees have been unable to reverse chronic conditions in themselves and in their children. This observation was put much more bluntly by Donna Gates when she stated that “a lot of… Read more »

Heil Schwarzbein! (New Version)

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We are drowning in what I call ‘nutritional minutiae.’ There is an endless stream of breaking news about such and such phytonutrient’s cancer-preventing properties, the latest antioxidant ‘discovery’ and on and on and on. On top of all that, there is a relentless fuss over pesticides, GMO’s, soy estrogens, and more. And then mainstream nutritionists focus on vitamins and minerals as if that’s the only thing that matters when it comes to health. Oh and then there are enzymes in raw food. Gotta worry about getting my enzymes now. And what type of exercise and how much? And am I spending enough hours in the sun, or too much? And how much mercury is in my fish? And did that cow eat grass or grain, and was that grain GMO… Read more »

Derma Dharma

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Don't be a PALE FACE

I don’t know if anyone’s noticed this, but there is lots of sub par skin out there. Somebody’s putting the derrr in Dermatology. Acne is very common, and not just in teenagers anymore. Eczema and psoriasis are prevalent. Skin Cancer is off the charts, and I don’t think it’s all because of the ozone layer. What is the most sensible way to nurture the skin and avoid these maladies and poor skin in general? Nowadays I have very healthy skin, and it gets healthier every year, but I still wouldn’t call myself an expert on skin health. I have worked hard to research and test some things out though – enough to wholeheartedly recommend them. At the very least, my typically opposite perspective will give you another potentially more logical… Read more »

The Milk Man

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My latest and certainly greatest title is “the milk man.” When people need to discern between me and another they sometimes say, “oh, you mean the milk man?” Every now and then I get a “hey, milk man!” For those of you who don’t already know, for the past month I’ve been interning at a raw dairy farm in Montrose, CO and driving 100+ gallons halfway across the state on my “route.” Doesn’t everybody milk cows on their days off? This is the semi-clever one I’ve been using relentlessly when faced with having to tell someone what I’ve been up to lately. But it’s true, after my day job I’ve been driving over two hours to get up at 4:30am and milk “the girls,” deliver milk all the way over… Read more »

Is My Illness Genetic?

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Genetic Flaws

It absolutely amazes me how many people think that their genes are what is making them overweight, covered in pimples with mouths full of crooked teeth, blind without glasses, bogged down by aching joints, and filled with tumors and clogged arteries. This simply isn’t true. We inherit certain things, even flaws and susceptibility to certain ailments, but this is because improper nutrition and lifestyle habits are cumulative. This is one of the reasons why things are getting progressively worse in terms of illness. Now don’t feel like I’m picking on you if you are one of the gullible ones who have bought into this. No one could’ve bit any harder on this one than I. In college I went so far as to deem myself unfit for reproduction. I thought… Read more »

Nature Knows Best

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Nature Knows Best

Many people know me as a bit of a naturalist, a purist. My whole philosophy for healthy living is based on respecting nature’s laws and honoring our physical makeup. Instinctively I’ve always felt a strong trust that if humans can eat food and live a lifestyle that is aligned with our evolutionary heritage, we will be vibrant and healthy guaranteed. Much of this belief came from my ability to cure myself of all my physical ailments by backpacking in the wilderness. I had debilitating asthma and agonizing back troubles for years that would clear up completely, 100%, in as little as 48 hours in the backcountry – and return almost instantly upon returning to civilization. This was merely the first step and the catalyst to much reflective thinking on how… Read more »