Posts Tagged: Fiber

Healthy Whole Grains?

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fiber and diverticulosis

By Anthony Colpo The late Ernest G. Ross once wrote: “About almost any subject, there are the facts ‘everyone knows’ and then there are the real ones.” Ross was referring to those snippets of wisdom that have been repeated so often most people simply assume they’re true, but when one starts searching for actual evidence it quickly becomes apparent there is none. Here are a few such gems: Red meat is bad for you. Vegetarians live longer. Saturated fat and high cholesterol levels cause heart disease. Carbs and insulin make you fat. These are just some of the bromides, incessantly fed to us by the media and so-called ‘experts,’ that I’ve already dissected elsewhere and shown to be totally false. Today, I’m going to take another widely-held and cherished mainstream… Read more »

About High-Fiber Diets. Do they help with IBS or Constipation?

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Fiber.  Gotta get that fiber.  Even the cartoon South Park is inundated with fiber propaganda, as one of the characters, Mr. Hanky, a talking turd overflowing with Christmas cheer, touts the benefits of “getting a lot of fiber” in your diet. Fiber is lauded as the holy substance that can help cause weight loss, relieve constipation, prevent colorectal disorders, stave off colon cancer, lower cholesterol levels, and just about everything else shy of reupholstering your furniture for you.  But fiber won’t help you fight disease any more than it will help the appearance of your old furniture. Most of the benefits attributed to fiber are the result of research done by a man named Denis Burkitt (of Burkitt’s lymphoma fame).  Burkitt, like many doctors, researchers, travelers, scholars, and anthropologists in… Read more »

Fiber Raises Metabolism

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I’ve highlighted all along that a diet revolving around unrefined carbohydrates – rich in nutrients and fiber in comparison with their refined counterparts, is fundamentally different from the typical low-fiber fare of the modern low-fat diet.  But I never expected my exploration would take me to a place where I believed that fiber could indirectly stimulate metabolism by raising leptin and lowering insulin resistance and inflammation by reducing levels of the hormone resistin as well.  Well, fiber can actually be kind of awesome – it’s fermentation triggering a big rise in the short-chain saturated fatty acids propionic and butyric acids in the digestive tract and more.  These fatty acids directly impact mitochondrial activity and therefore metabolism, appetite regulation, bacterial composition of the digestive tract, and more that is associated with great resistance to… Read more »

FUMP Day 9

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Day 9 and going strong… Got a little exercise today and definitely felt a little faint in comparison to my usual self. My heart was still pounding unusually hard and fast for the amount of exertion I was putting out there. I was really busy doing a bunch of other writing today. As we speak I think I’ve already topped the 20-page mark, so I’ll save my juice for the commemorative Day 10, which is, for those who aren’t mathematicians, tomorrow. Today’s menu was pretty exciting. I cooked for convenience today, not variety, and it wasn’t all that enjoyable to be honest. Still, the nice thing about the diet so far is that food is something you stick in your mouth, chew, and swallow. It’s like a whole new level… Read more »

Diverticulosis

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This week is evidently digestion week. It began with an email from a friend on helping out with a digestive condition called “diverticulosis,” which she referred to, unknown of the spelling, as “diver-tickle-o-sis.” Next, some friends came over for dinner and, naturally, we talked about IBS while eating. I’m a classy dinner host no doubt. For starters, diverticulosis is a condition, an extremely common one, where pockets form in the intestines and fill with fecal matter. They are basically small blowouts in the intestinal walls, where it balloons out and gets clogged. As this mass ferments and continues to stretch out the intestinal walls, inflammation can set in, causing the development of a condition called diverticulitis. As with IBS, these conditions are both caused and exacerbated by malabsorption, and more… Read more »

Hypothyroidism

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It’s amazing to me how some of the most important realizations that I’ve come to over the past year have come from fragments of information obtained from some really misguided people. One of the biggest discoveries was differentiating between how complex starches and simple sugars affect the human body, shown to me by Terry Shintani, the author of a book touting an extremely low fat vegan diet. Through his work, he was able to show that complex starches leave sugar in the blood to be used as fuel, unlike simple sugars from fruit, cookies, breakfast cereals and the like, which causes insulin to rise higher than the level of blood sugar and induce hypoglycemia. This idea was further reinforced by Francine Kauffman of the American Diabetes Association, who discovered that… Read more »

180 Degree Sneak Peek – Hyperinsulinemia and Friends

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…Carbohydrates alone do not cause insulin resistance. Having your insulin levels rise over and over again in response to carbohydrate-rich meals does not solely lead to insulin resistance and the compensatory hyperinsulinemia that is at the core of modern diseases. Most people on the low-carb side of the fence would have you believe that our Paleolithic evolutionary genetic programming has left us incapable of ingesting so many carbohydrates – that the amount of carbohydrates we’re currently eating is too much. That’s what the low-carbers really believe, that the human being is not designed to eat but a tiny amount of carbohydrates. Here are some kinks. Some of the healthiest, leanest, and longest-living human groups ever discovered eat a very high carbohydrate diet. The Sikhs of India and the Hunzas of… Read more »

Hungry, Hungry Hippos

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The question I promised to answer in last week’s self-starvation experiment saga was “why are we so hungry if we’re eating more than ever before?” This is one of the biggest questions of the 21st century, and the correct answer may hold the key to unlocking the entire degenerative process that began at the dawn of carbohydrate refining. Most people agree that the cause of the Diabesity epidemic (a great term that I stumbled across, as the two, type II Diabetes and obesity, often go hand in hand) is eating too much and exercising too little. But as anyone who has read more than a few paragraphs of this blog knows, my opinions differ. I certainly see this ballooning phenomenon having far more complexity. It is clear that Americans, as… Read more »

Stability Foods

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In the most recent posts, we discussed elevated insulin levels and the therapeutic benefit of following a specific diet to bring insulin levels under control. Bringing the insulin levels back to normal, but not going too far by eliminating carbohydrates, can allow metabolic healing over time. Degenerative diseases, obesity, and chronic departure from homeostasis are really just metabolic disorders at the core. So taking the time to get back to balance, although it is a challenge, is rewarding – not just because you might live a few extra years or something like that, but because you can feel and perform better now. Right now. Every day. Foods that are the most stabilizing, that keep blood sugar levels from fluctuating, which allow insulin levels to fall and recalibrate at a level… Read more »

Research Quotes 2007

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“The single greatest factor in the acquisition and maintenance of good health is perfectly constituted food.”-Sir Robert McCarrison; Nutrition and Health (1936) “The truth will always be in the minority. Always, always, always… You will never find it in the hallways of conventional institutions. You will find it in pockets, in clusters, individually. And it will not be mainstream.”-Joel Salatin; Everything I Want to Do is Illegal (2007) “Nutrition is the master healing science. All else is mere remedy at best. Nutrition necessitates lifestyle change, while other methods, effective as they may seem, are temporary if nutritional changes are neglected. We cannot hope to get well by taking medication and consuming junk food… all other therapeutic disciplines are secondary to nutrition… Nutrition is the Master Science and stands above all… Read more »

2007 Reading List

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* Denotes work of particular significance and/or exceptional integrity(Chronological order as they were read)… The Maker’s DietJordan Rubin *Nourishing TraditionsSally Fallon Cholesterol MythsUffe Ravnskov Enzyme NutritionEdward Howell *Nutrition and Physical DegenerationWeston Price Pottenger’s CatsFrancis Pottenger Caffeine BluesStephen Cherniske Eat Fat Lose FatSally Fallon Waking the Tiger Peter A. Levine The Milk BookWilliam Campbell Douglass Solved: The Riddle of IllnessStephen Langer/J. Scheer Sugar BluesWilliam Dufty Excitotoxins: The Taste that KillsRussell Blaylock The Diet CureJulia Ross *The Schwarzbein Principle Diana Schwarzbein Know Your FatsMary Enig Seven Weeks to SobrietyJoan Mathews Larson The Garden of FertilityKatie Singer The Untold Story of Milk Ron Schmid Secrets of the SoilPeter Tompkins Lick the Sugar HabitNancy Appleton *Traditional Foods Are Your Best MedicineRon Schmid *Recipe for Living Free of DiseaseAajonus Vonderplanitz Raw to RadiantKim Cohen Fiber… Read more »

Tony the Tiger Ate My Appendix

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Constipation

I read a simple but truly revolutionary book recently called Fiber Menace. It ties in beautifully with so many other things I’ve encountered, but really puts it into a common sense perspective. Fiber is indigestible material. It is something that the human body cannot digest. Humans benefit from eating an abundant amount of foods that are fully digestible, not indigestible. Although we are omnivores and can certainly derive energy from fiber-containing carbohydrate foods (only carbs contain fiber), because they are partially indigestible they are not ideal human foods. When suboptimal human foods are overconsumed, disaster strikes in a myriad of ways. My first encounter with too much fiber came as just a young pup. I grew up in a “whole-grain family.” Many of my breakfasts were the All-American high fiber/high… Read more »