Posts Tagged: Fructose

Everyone Knows What’s Best for a Fat Person

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best weight loss diet

By Matt Stone Girl: I need to lose 40 pounds in the next 3 months. Anybody have any ideas? Random Internet Guy: Exercise fasted. You’ll thank me later. I saw a conversation on Facebook recently that went almost exactly like that. At the post office, I overheard a postal worker telling a guy that eating more fruits and vegetables and exercising every day was a surefire ticket to lasting weight loss. A friend of mine once told his fat older brother that all he needed was a stationary bike, and he could kiss that unsightly blubber goodbye. Ask any low-carber what fat Joe should do. He just needs to enter ketosis. Freaking carb addict. In my early 20′s, all my mom needed to do to lose weight was stop drinking Coke. In 2012, fat people just needed to cut out the gluten. In… Read more »

Sugar Eating Competition Results

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fructose friday

Here it is folks!  The official day has arrived (although you are welcome to compete on Saturday or Sunday if you are unable to compete today for some reason).  Please record the number of grams of sugar you consume in no more than a 60-minute period in the comments section below.  With that, include your estimated body weight in kilograms (Pounds to kg calculator). And finally, divide the number of grams of sugar by your weight in kilograms to calculate your sugar consumption in Lustigs… Example:  600 grams sugar/60kg = 10 Lustigs The winner will be declared on Monday.  May the best man and woman NOT win.  It would actually be cooler if the man and woman with the most visible abs won, to help settle some fructophobia. 3 Titles will be given.  1 for Male with… Read more »

Robert Lustig Fructose Friday

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Robert Lustig sugar fructose

A couple of days ago, April 1st to be exact (unfortunately this wasn’t an April Fools Joke), anti-fructose crusader Robert Lustig, among others, were interviewed on a special 60 Minutes segment called “Is Sugar Toxic?” 4 years ago almost to the day I was saying “Fruc Fructose.”  But nowadays I find myself saying “Luck Fustig!”  While the case against fructose is very compelling on the surface (de novo lipogenesis, lower leptin secretion, raises uric acid levels, we’re eating more of it, statistically – soft drinks are fattening, sugar feeds cancer, yada yada), I had to face the fact that sugar, in all its glory, did some pretty impressive things for my health when I finally let my biofeedback, as opposed to a neat youtube video, some rat studies, and a couple dozen books, determine whether or… Read more »

Dangers and Side Effects of High Fructose Corn Syrup

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It’s made from corn silly!  It’s good for you! Has anybody seen those ads?  The ones put out by the Corn Refiners Association?  I have. Not only are there numerous dangers of high-fructose corn syrup, there’s actually dangers of high-fructose corn syrup commercials – I laughed so hard when I saw those I nearly fell out of my chair and bonked my head. The high-fructose corn syrup dangers all stem from the fact that it is completely devoid of nutrients, extremely sweet and addictive, and loaded with an isolated, refined form of fructose that is very difficult for the human body to properly process. Astute researcher Gary Taubes calls fructose “the most lipogenic carbohydrate,” meaning that it has a tendency to get converted to fat more than any other type… Read more »

Fructose

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Fructose, a type of sugar, has historically been granted a “get out of jail free” card due to its presence in fruit.  It’s the same sugar that’s in fruit, and fruit is healthy, so fructose must be healthy goes the story.  But is there such as thing as too much?  Without a doubt, yes.  Also, when it’s in the form of a refined sugar does it behave the same as the tiny amount of fructose found in natural fruit? I’m sure you’ve guessed, as I dedicated a whole category solely to it, that the answer is “hell no!” One of the biggest dietary departures if not the biggest dietary departure from traditional human diets is the massive increase in the consumption of fructose.  Whether one could ever consume too much… Read more »

Fat vs. Fruit

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Recently I’ve been trying to take it easy on my friend fruit. For years I’ve advocated an entirely sugar-free approach to overcoming certain health problems, and when my diet was very high in fat, fruit was a major aggravator of health issues – like tooth pain, them little tongue bump things, emotional irrationality, joint pain, allergies, asthma, and fat gain – and zits too. Aurora’s response is identical, only worse on many of those fronts. Same for dozens of others that I’ve had these discussions with. However, my past experiences with fruit weren’t necessarily congruent with my newer, more recent condemnations of fruit. For example, in 2005 I did all kinds of “cleanses” and forever improved my health doing so. These cleanses were based primarily around sweet fruits, fruit-only smoothies,… Read more »

Don Gorske Big Mac Prediction

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Truth be told, I’m a little bit of a Don Gorske groupie. In November, on a trip to visit Aurora’s extended family in Wisconsin, I did go so far as to have a Big Mac in Gorske’s home of Fond Du Lac. I looked for the Mac Daddy, did not see him unfortunately, but took great comedic pleasure in enjoying my first Big Mac in about a year at a location in which perhaps the most prestigious fast food eater on earth has eaten literally thousands of Big Macs. Gorske, born in 1953, had his first Big Mac in 1972. From that point on, Gorske has had a Big Mac nearly every day – and has now consumed roughly 24,000. He got married at a Mickey D’s. He has saved… Read more »

Still Rethinking Hypothyroidism

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Last week’s podcast introduced a new concept – the concept of leptin resistance being the predominant hormonal cause of having a low body temperature. This of course, is not the only cause. Having low levels of leptin like that of an anorexic will certainly manifest in the form of low body temperature just as high leptin levels in someone with low leptin sensitivity will. If your thyroid gland truly doesn’t work like it should, or the TSH signals coming from the pituitary aren’t functioning well, then you’re likely to have a low body temperature as well. This probably has absolutely nothing to do with leptin. But having hypothyroid symptoms, or having a low body temperature – the gauge used to diagnose hypothyroidism by Mark Starr, Stephan Langer, and Broda Barnes,… Read more »

Fructose, Leptin, and Insulin Resistance podcasts

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The podcasts are now archived on my Youtube channel: 180degreehealth. I won’t always do a blog post featuring every podcast that I post, but wanted everyone to know that they can subscribe to the 180degreehealth channel and receive updates whenever I do a new recording or video there. Here are the first two podcasts for 2010 – a 2-part series on the connection between fructose, leptin, and insulin resistance as discussed in recent posts. Please help 180 out by subscribing to 180degreehealth on Youtube. http://youtube.com/180degreehealth

Leptin and Reversing type 2 Diabetes

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As most of you have heard, my new eBook, 180 Degree Diabetes – Preventing and Reversing Insulin Resistance, Metabolic Syndrome, and Type 2 Diabetes, has been published. In that book, I fail to talk about the connection between the hormone leptin and type 2 diabetes, although I’m fully aware of it. The book was complicated enough, and the bottom line is that overfeeding HED-style has the ability to decrease insulin resistance. It is quite possible, however, that it does this because overfeeding raises leptin levels, and leptin is the master hormone that may control insulin resistance – even more so than cortisol which I chose to focus on instead. On page 87 of 180 Degree Diabetes, I use a quote by Russ Farris from The Potbelly Syndrome, which is discussed… Read more »

The Low-Carb Oops

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For quite some time now I’ve been bashing the very simple idea that low-carbohydrate proponents get repeatedly tripped up on. Everyone from Barry Sears to Gary Taubes lives under the false idea that: 1) Insulin is bad.2) Carbohydrates are bad because they cause temporary spikes in insulin levels.3) Eating too many carbohydrates over many years causes insulin to not work very well anymore, “wearing out the mechanism,” known as insulin resistance.Trouble is, there are some major illogical glitches in this nonsense. The first and foremost glitch is that many, if not most human beings throughout history have been found to eat lots of carbohydrates and have excellent health. In no shape or form did any of the groups that Weston A. Price observed eating loads of carbohydrates exemplify any of… Read more »

In Bread Pudding

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As I scour through Richard Johnson’s The Sugar Fix, which is without question strengthening my already very strong views about the role of fructose in the development of obesity, type II diabetes, and other disorders related to insulin resistance – I couldn’t help but point out a redneck creation that finally went from joke to actuality this afternoon. Months ago I was visiting my half brother and his family in Knoxville and came up with a vile concoction in my head – designed purely for entertainment value, as part of a hypothetical “Tennessee Diet.” I had yet to develop a name for this heinous creation, but fantasize about it at length I did. This weekend saw the power of imagination, humor, disgust, and horror congregate and materialize into this blessed… Read more »

FUMP Day 11

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The lack of hunger… On my commemorative 10th day I pointed out an unusual but fully expected phenomenon of hardcore carnivorism – lack of hunger. I attribute this primarily to a drop in insulin levels and the subsequent release of stored fatty acids through the pipes. On a recent trip to D.C. I visited the Library of Congress and dug up a nice classic on obesity, entitled, oh so cleverly, Obesity, edited by renowned obesity researcher M.R.C. Greenwood. Greenwood, in the final chapter in which he authors, goes into detail on perhaps the most important fundamental of appetite and obesity as they relate to the hormone insulin. The concept of fuel-partitioning, or as I’m now calling it, “the calorie greenhouse.” I’ve gone into detail on this phenomenon a couple times… Read more »

Diverticulosis

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This week is evidently digestion week. It began with an email from a friend on helping out with a digestive condition called “diverticulosis,” which she referred to, unknown of the spelling, as “diver-tickle-o-sis.” Next, some friends came over for dinner and, naturally, we talked about IBS while eating. I’m a classy dinner host no doubt. For starters, diverticulosis is a condition, an extremely common one, where pockets form in the intestines and fill with fecal matter. They are basically small blowouts in the intestinal walls, where it balloons out and gets clogged. As this mass ferments and continues to stretch out the intestinal walls, inflammation can set in, causing the development of a condition called diverticulitis. As with IBS, these conditions are both caused and exacerbated by malabsorption, and more… Read more »

Hypothyroidism

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It’s amazing to me how some of the most important realizations that I’ve come to over the past year have come from fragments of information obtained from some really misguided people. One of the biggest discoveries was differentiating between how complex starches and simple sugars affect the human body, shown to me by Terry Shintani, the author of a book touting an extremely low fat vegan diet. Through his work, he was able to show that complex starches leave sugar in the blood to be used as fuel, unlike simple sugars from fruit, cookies, breakfast cereals and the like, which causes insulin to rise higher than the level of blood sugar and induce hypoglycemia. This idea was further reinforced by Francine Kauffman of the American Diabetes Association, who discovered that… Read more »

Fat as Fuel

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The challenge of dealing with the obesity epidemic is one of the most interesting debates in the field of human health. Most people feel the answer is already there, “eat less and exercise more stupid.” Not so fast. The body has feedback mechanisms in place to maintain a constant weight. If you eat too little, metabolism slows down and you get more hungry. If you eat too much, metabolism speeds up and you get less hungry. Anyone can gain or lose a few pounds by suddenly changing exercise levels and food intake before these homeostatic mechanisms catch up, but going beyond those parameters is difficult unless the feedback mechanism is broken. The feedback loop is broken when there is inequality between the metabolic rate and hunger levels. An overweight person… Read more »

180 Degree Metabolism Sneak Peek: "Fat and Hungry"

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…Basically yes, the calories you ingest is your income. Your insulin levels determine the percentage of that income that is diverted into savings. The higher the income, the higher the savings: the more you eat, the fatter you get, especially if those calories are in the form of simple sugars like sucrose or high-fructose corn syrup, which directly raise insulin levels higher when paired with a high-glycemic load and indirectly via their effect on cortisol and eicosanoids. Higher insulin levels mean a greater diversion of energy into storage, which means it takes an ever-increasing amount of food to satisfy your active tissues, and it is the demand of the active tissue that determines whether or not your are satiated. Therefore, instead of your metabolism rising with the surplus of food,… Read more »

180 Degree Sneak Peek – Hyperinsulinemia and Friends

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…Carbohydrates alone do not cause insulin resistance. Having your insulin levels rise over and over again in response to carbohydrate-rich meals does not solely lead to insulin resistance and the compensatory hyperinsulinemia that is at the core of modern diseases. Most people on the low-carb side of the fence would have you believe that our Paleolithic evolutionary genetic programming has left us incapable of ingesting so many carbohydrates – that the amount of carbohydrates we’re currently eating is too much. That’s what the low-carbers really believe, that the human being is not designed to eat but a tiny amount of carbohydrates. Here are some kinks. Some of the healthiest, leanest, and longest-living human groups ever discovered eat a very high carbohydrate diet. The Sikhs of India and the Hunzas of… Read more »

Malabsorption

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First off, apologies to my long-time followers for always being so preoccupied with Weston A. Price and others that witnessed the sudden dramatic decline of health at the dawn of modern food. But the shift of human health really dominates my thinking. From the beginning I’ve really been perplexed and driven to understand how and what, specifically, brought about this shift. As a very brief recap for all the newbies, Price directly observed a dramatic change in physical, mental, and even societal health amongst several independent groups of humans worldwide, as they were exposed to modern foods for the first time from a previously natural, nutritious, and untainted diet. Highlights include improper formation of facial structure resulting in crooked teeth, something we now just consider to be normal and “genetic”… Read more »

Fruc Fructose

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Fructose is a kind of sugar. There are many kinds of sugars: sucrose, lactose, galactose, maltose, dextrose, raffinose, glucose, and bunches more. Fructose is just one type. Fructose is famous for being the type of sugar found in fruit. Because of this association with fruit, considered to be a very nutritious and overall healthy food to be included in the daily diet of every man, woman, and child, fructose has been given unfair judgment. We might want to take a moment to investigate fructose a little further though, because there’s a legitimate possibility that it is the biggest single contributor to chronic disease. For realsies. As those who have done their homework have discovered, there is a striking correlation between the availability of refined sugar and the widespread onset of… Read more »