Posts Tagged: Insulin Resistance

How We Get Fat

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chrisfarley

No this is not a book review of Gary Taubes’s Why We Get Fat.  Rather, this is a post about the reality of how people pack on extra weight minus Taubes’s incorrect and shortsighted assessment of biochemistry. A question I get as often, or more often than any other, is “Well then, what does cause people to become fat?”  Believe it or not, this question involves more than just a one-word response, such as “carbs” or “fat” or “junk” or “stress” or “calories.” I’m finding it difficult to coax some people who really need a dense calorie supply in order to normalize their metabolic rate into eating common foods.  It seems that many people who gravitate towards strange diets find a lot of comfort in the strangeness of their diet… Read more »

Do These Genes Make Me Look Fat?

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GrayGraham

By Rob Archangel, 180DegreeHealth.com staff writer Welcome back to the Real Food Summit roundup. Today, I spent a couple hours listening to Gray Graham of the Price Pottenger Nutritional Foundation talk about epigenetics and the hereditary aspects of illness. That dude really doesn’t like high glycemic foods. He mentioned their alleged dangers probably a dozen times or more, and targets them for messing up our self-regulating good health. As Matt mentioned in a recent video, glycemic index is a lousy way to determine what you should eat or what sort of impact a given food is likely to have on you. Even if a given food spikes our insulin really high and really fast, it is our insulin sensitivity that determines whether this is problematic.  If we’re insulin resistant, we… Read more »

Glucose Clearance

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“My high sugar diet has really improved my glucose clearance. My 1-hour post-prandial readings decreased from 120′s to the upper 90′s. My waking temps are 97.8, up to 98.4 after eating (that’s during the first half of my cycle, I get even hotter the second half). Plus I’m happy, energetic, sleeping well and waking up spontaneously and well rested at about 6am. I’m enjoying eating lots and lots of fruit, some milk, a little gelatin here and there, lots of carbs, a smattering of meat and veggies. I avoid [polyunsaturated fats], but not obsessively. And I eat Lemon Sorbet whenever I feel like it. :-)” ~Jessica Johnson I’m in Reno for a couple of months, and, naturally, I went to a casino restaurant where some Asian dude (not Debbie’s husband)… Read more »

Metabolic Syndrome X Causes of Insulin Resistance & Metabolic Syndrome Diet

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Your eyes are getting heavy.  Look deeply at my swinging pendulum.  You are very relaxed.  Now let’s count down to one starting at five.  Five-four-three-two… Okay that was a pretty weak attempt to hypnotize you, but that’s exactly what I wish I could do.  I would love to perform some hypnosis on all earthlings and erase how they look at causes of insulin resistance and excess body fat – how it gets there, why it’s there, and what can be done to fix it and prevent it from getting there in the first place. Modern obesity researchers have really helped to paint a much better understanding of body fat by introducing Metabolic Syndrome X. For starters, consider that scientists have selectively bred a certain strain of mice to become overweight… Read more »

Endurance Exercise and Metabolism

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  After a grueling 2-mile ride on my girlfriend’s cruiser bike (“Mojito”) while talking on a cell phone – and carrying a large load (1 book) in the basket on my way to the post office, I figured now was a perfectly good time to lay out some definitive 180 thoughts on the topic of exercise. On many other occassions I have talked about triglycerides. Yes, the blood level can be revealing, but more important is the amount of triglyceride – or fat, that hangs out in the muscles. This is referred to as intramuscular triglyceride, or intramyocellular fat. It appears that this intramyocellular fat is the primary driver of insulin resistance, and also leptin resistance which increases appetite and reduces metabolism/body temperature even if you are overweight and eating a… Read more »

Lower Triglycerides

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Here are a couple of fresh new videos about Triglycerides – little fat molecules that hang out in our blood, tissues, and liver.  The first is an ode to what you can do to lower your triglyceride levels if that is an issue, and what metabolic effects can be expected if you do (reduced leptin and insulin resistance and a corresponding decrease in the appetite to metabolism ratio, increased energy levels, and so on). The gist, for you video haters out there, would be to: 1) Increase the starch to simple sugar ratio in the diet – particularly fructose found in soft drinks and juices 2) Reduce alcohol consumption 3) Increase fiber intake (unrefined starches instead of refined starches) 4) Decrease the omega 6 to omega 3 ratio in your diet… Read more »

RRARF Addendum

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As many of you know, over the last couple of months we’ve been exploring a diet that displaces more fat with starch as opposed to eating more or less equal amounts of the two.  When it comes to lowering cortisol, improving leptin sensitivity, improving insulin sensitivity, impoving body composition, raising metaoblism, and keeping fat gain minimal while eating to appetite or slightly beyond appetite – which are basically the objectives of the eating and lifestyle program created in the eBook DIET RECOVERY, starch immediately stands out as being superior to fat in each and every one of those categories. And of course, the vast majority of the most metabolically-healthy people on earth eat what could be called a “starch-based diet” in which well over half of ingested calories come from some starchy… Read more »

Barry Sears and The Perfect Nutritional Storm

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Barry Sears calls high insulin levels paired with a diet with excessive omega 6 the “perfect nutritional storm.”  There is no doubt in my mind that the American diet, which is known to be very proficient at inducing insulin resistance while supplying the largest quantity of dietary omega 6 Linoleic Acid in the world, is the perfect recipe for inflammation-related diseases.  Sears of course uses the Glycemic Index as his guide to keeping insulin levels low, which is a major fumble on his part.  Postprandial insulin levels in response to dietary carbohydrate is insignificant, as the levels fall back to baseline within a few hours of eating.  It’s the dietary causes of insulin resistance – most notably fructose in large quantities (a low-glycemic carbohdyrate) that appears to be most significant.  In an insulin resistant state, insulin levels… Read more »

The Count the Obese Starch-Eater Game

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Recently I got into a jovial, light-hearted back and forth on Twitter about obesity, carbohydrates, yada, yada.  Some heavy artillery was slung my way, a recent article that, several days later Tom Naughton of Fat Head dedicated an entire blog post to.  The premise of the article was that the whole obesity thing was a Big Fat Lie!  Well, I agree.  But the author concluded that replacing fat with starch was the reason the epidemic of obesity continued to surge in Great Britain over the last couple of decades.  Read the article here for a good dose of low-carbism.    This conclusion is pretty hilarious.  Has this person ever been to Thailand, or Laos, or Nepal, or Vietnam, or Japan, or Cambodia?  Well, I have been to all of those countries,… Read more »

Is a Low-Carb Diet Counterproductive?

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starch foods

I was asked to shed some light this morning on why I think low-carb diets are counterproductive for healing the metabolism.   Thought I would share an elaborated version of my response… Several things make me very leery of going low-carb, or at least make me feel that it is counterproductive: 1) Several authors, such as Diana Schwarzbein and Barry Sears talk about cortisol being raised on a low-carb diet as if it were common biochemistry knowledge. Knowing what I know about cortisol, a low-carb diet seems very undesirable. Diana Schwarzbein repeats the mantra that “going too low in carbohydrates raises cortisol and adrenaline” time and time again throughout her work. Keep in mind she observed this by tracking her patients’ hormone levels as a practicing endocrinologist. Barry Sears emphatically states: “…the longer… Read more »

Fructose, Leptin, and Insulin Resistance podcasts

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The podcasts are now archived on my Youtube channel: 180degreehealth. I won’t always do a blog post featuring every podcast that I post, but wanted everyone to know that they can subscribe to the 180degreehealth channel and receive updates whenever I do a new recording or video there. Here are the first two podcasts for 2010 – a 2-part series on the connection between fructose, leptin, and insulin resistance as discussed in recent posts. Please help 180 out by subscribing to 180degreehealth on Youtube. http://youtube.com/180degreehealth

Nutrient Bombardment

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I’ve had a little bit of a thing going lately with eating the most nutritious food that I can get my hands on.  This was one of the first attitudes that I ever developed while attempting to improve my health through diet long, long ago.  Only problem was that back then I was primarily a vegetarian.  I was missing out on some very important nutrients that put a nutritious diet to good use.  For three days last week I kept close track of everything that I ate just so I could share my numbers with you guys.  I plugged all my data into some very expensive software that I purchased a couple of years ago (ESHA).  As you will be able to see in a minute when you go to check out… Read more »

Vegan Aftermath

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My experiences after going on a two-week vegan escapade couldn’t be more reaffirming of the general conclusions that I’ve come to over my several years of study. It’s certainly worth sharing and pondering now that I’ve had some time to let the whole experience digest. Although I certainly enjoyed stirring things up in the low-carb community, pointing out many of the ways in which low-carb dogma is an oversimplification of human biology, I am left with little doubt that damage is done while pursuing vegan diets. Of course, I haven’t doubted this for years – and have relegated such diets to short-term fasts at the most. But consider my typical dieter’s consequences after doing the nutritarian-vegan thing: 1) It took me 14 days to lose 5.5 pounds, and 6 days… Read more »

FUDA Day 11

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“Sigh” says Matt Stone as he listens to an interview between Gary Taubes and Jimmy Moore on filing a class-action lawsuit on the government… Yeah, I was just listening to a Taubes interview done by Jimmy Moore of “Livin’ la Vida Low Carb” lore. It was painful. It’s like, I love Gary Taubes so much. He makes the most sound and sophisticated arguments challenging the weight loss mantra of the modern world. He sucks you in. He talks about refined carbohydrates and their ‘guilty until proven innocent’ relationship to human health problems. He talks about the lack of causal relationship between eating a lot of calories and accumulating excess body fat. He relies upon legendary health greats like T.L. Cleave as he throws massive punches at the outdated way to… Read more »

FUDA Day 8

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Well folks, not much exciting happening here except of course that both diets are proving to be useful at dropping glucose levels. Our fasting glucose levels this morning were 80 and 82 mg/dl – both in the perfect range. My levels are remarkably consistent, having busted out a 79 or 80 for 5 straight days now. We are both feeling pretty good too. My skin is ridiculous, and my teeth feel great despite only brushing twice thus far. So if these are wondrous diets that reduce fasting glucose, what could be the problem? Well, as you guys already know, I’ve knocked on both low-carb and vegan diets pretty hard over the course of this journey. I’ve railed them because both seem particularly counterproductive over the long-term despite nothing short of… Read more »

FUDA Day 5

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We have a winner. This dietary experiment will forever be known as the FUDA Diet. “F.U. Dr. Atkins!” Kinda harsh treatment for a dead guy, but political correctness isn’t exactly the theme here. Whaddya expect from a guy holding a pig’s head that shares the same first and last name with one of the co-creators of South Park? “Page realized that the (dental) plaque, decay, and deterioration he saw were all related to other physical problems his patients might be having. To understand why this deterioration was taking place, he studied more than 2,000 hospital patients and his own dental patients’ blood chemistries. His studies showed that no bone loss occurred and no cavities formed when blood tests registered the following:1. There were approximately 10 mg/dl of calcium in the… Read more »

Sunny D #4

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“We do not remember seeing a single cancer case who had a correct blood sugar level, yet in most non-cancer cases this is easily obtained by means of a (refined) sugar-free diet alone.” -Melvin Page and Leon Abrams The correct blood sugar level was obtained by doing a fasting glucose test similar to what I’ve been doing each morning. The ideal level was hovering closely around the 85 mg/dl level. How did Page come to this conclusion and make such startling discoveries about cancer and other degenerative diseases? It’s quite simple. He was a dentist in charge of treating tooth decay. When taking blood glucose readings, a correlation between tooth decay and high fasting glucose levels emerges pretty quickly. Once you start sniffing that trail, one thing leads to another… Read more »

Summer Recap Part II

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Well, I’m not going to totally go off on my summer diet. I did want to give a few basic details for all those interested. For the first time in several years, I did decide to experiment with a little ice cream. I chose Haagen Daz because of the short ingredient list and lack of indigestible substances such as Guar Gum, Carageenan, and/or Xanthan Gum. On my days off I would intentionally do a high-calorie day like that recommended by Scott Abel. It may have helped me maintain muscle mass, just like Season 2 in which I ate a half dozen doughnuts for breakfast every day, but the idea overall was probably pretty dumb – especially using ice cream, a food that I’ve known to be my primary nemesis for over… Read more »

The Low-Carb Oops

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For quite some time now I’ve been bashing the very simple idea that low-carbohydrate proponents get repeatedly tripped up on. Everyone from Barry Sears to Gary Taubes lives under the false idea that: 1) Insulin is bad.2) Carbohydrates are bad because they cause temporary spikes in insulin levels.3) Eating too many carbohydrates over many years causes insulin to not work very well anymore, “wearing out the mechanism,” known as insulin resistance.Trouble is, there are some major illogical glitches in this nonsense. The first and foremost glitch is that many, if not most human beings throughout history have been found to eat lots of carbohydrates and have excellent health. In no shape or form did any of the groups that Weston A. Price observed eating loads of carbohydrates exemplify any of… Read more »