Posts Tagged: Metabolism

The Hamburglar’s Metabolism

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For those of you who don’t have multiple hours set aside to read through the vast collection of over 300 interesting comments that followed the last 180 Bloggie post, I thought I’d bring you up to speed. For quite some time I have been pondering the multiple expressions of a suboptimal metabolism to the point where I have begun believing that it is the most common root source of the greatest epidemic – the one that rules over all the others like that ring movie with the fat Goonie in it. The metabolism, a concerted effort on behalf of the endocrine glands, the liver, and more truly controls the function of every single cell. It controls the speed at which food travels from one hole to the other. It controls… Read more »

FUMP Day 12

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Yesterday we addressed appetite, metabolism, lipolysis, and some goodies like that as it relates to carbohydrate consumption. I would go into far more detail today, but I’m having some trouble sleeping on this all-meat diet! Dream recall is the best of my life; however, but for the last decade the majority of my dreams involve either urinating or defecating or both, and not being able to stop, so I can’t say the dream recall really thrills me. I go through at least 20 times the quantity of toilet paper in my dreams as I do in reality. Actually, my sleep has felt pretty good, and my energy levels are very stable and lasting. Still, the dark coloration under my eyes ain’t lookin’ so pretty. Energized perhaps, but a friend of… Read more »

FUMP Day 11

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The lack of hunger… On my commemorative 10th day I pointed out an unusual but fully expected phenomenon of hardcore carnivorism – lack of hunger. I attribute this primarily to a drop in insulin levels and the subsequent release of stored fatty acids through the pipes. On a recent trip to D.C. I visited the Library of Congress and dug up a nice classic on obesity, entitled, oh so cleverly, Obesity, edited by renowned obesity researcher M.R.C. Greenwood. Greenwood, in the final chapter in which he authors, goes into detail on perhaps the most important fundamental of appetite and obesity as they relate to the hormone insulin. The concept of fuel-partitioning, or as I’m now calling it, “the calorie greenhouse.” I’ve gone into detail on this phenomenon a couple times… Read more »

Fat as Fuel

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The challenge of dealing with the obesity epidemic is one of the most interesting debates in the field of human health. Most people feel the answer is already there, “eat less and exercise more stupid.” Not so fast. The body has feedback mechanisms in place to maintain a constant weight. If you eat too little, metabolism slows down and you get more hungry. If you eat too much, metabolism speeds up and you get less hungry. Anyone can gain or lose a few pounds by suddenly changing exercise levels and food intake before these homeostatic mechanisms catch up, but going beyond those parameters is difficult unless the feedback mechanism is broken. The feedback loop is broken when there is inequality between the metabolic rate and hunger levels. An overweight person… Read more »

180 Degree Metabolism Sneak Peek (cont…)

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…In essence, if you have excess fat accumulating on your body, then there is a mismatch between your metabolic rate and your appetite. Your metabolic rate may be set for 2,000 calories a day to break even, but your stomach isn’t satisfied until you hit 3,000 calories. For a healthy person with a healthy metabolism, even overeating cannot induce excessive weight gain. In fact, in a force-feeding study performed on prisoners by Ian Prior in which the inmates were forced to eat 10,000 calories per day for several months, some of the subjects gained less than 10 pounds. That’s because our bodies can make natural adjustments to a surplus of food to prevent excessive weight gain. When we up our calories beyond what we desire, appetite goes down while metabolism… Read more »

180 Degree Metabolism Sneak Peek: "Fat and Hungry"

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…Basically yes, the calories you ingest is your income. Your insulin levels determine the percentage of that income that is diverted into savings. The higher the income, the higher the savings: the more you eat, the fatter you get, especially if those calories are in the form of simple sugars like sucrose or high-fructose corn syrup, which directly raise insulin levels higher when paired with a high-glycemic load and indirectly via their effect on cortisol and eicosanoids. Higher insulin levels mean a greater diversion of energy into storage, which means it takes an ever-increasing amount of food to satisfy your active tissues, and it is the demand of the active tissue that determines whether or not your are satiated. Therefore, instead of your metabolism rising with the surplus of food,… Read more »

180 Degree Sneak Peek – "Thy Thyroid"

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A sample of the first download that will be made available at 180degreehealth.com, “180 Degree Metabolism”… …Suffice it to say that, because of the metabolism-regulating action of the thyroid gland, that trying to eat less and exercise more as a solution to the obesity epidemic is like a dog chasing its tail. It hasn’t been effective advice for the general public because it doesn’t work. It is merely a short-term solution, with negative consequences, which provides the temporary illusion of success – like cleaning a room by stuffing everything under the bed. Eating too much and exercising too little isn’t the predominant cause of the obesity epidemic either per se. The world is full of people who eat to they’re satisfied at every meal and hardly ever break a sweat… Read more »