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Absoltely NUTS!

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  • #15061
    Sugarplum
    Participant

    Hey guys!

    I’m new here and am currently reading EFH and DR2, but I’m still a bit confused about what foods are ok for raising metabolism.

    I’m particularly wondering about nuts – especially nut butters…mmmmmm!

    Also curious to know if there are any veggies that are ok to eat e.g. asparagus, mushrooms, beets, spinach…..I do love these veggies!

    And finally, what about whey and casein protein powders? I like to mix these into yoghurts, porridge etc (i.e. not drink them as a fluid).

    Thanks in advance! :)

    #15062
    Insider Fuzzy
    Participant

    I’m pretty sure nut butter contains a lot of PUFA. I would stay away from that completely. Veggies are good when you already have a high metabolism. When it comes to casein, high amounts of protein is not a good thing, it lowers the metabolic rate.

    EFH book will pretty much explain all the foods to raise metabolism, but for me personally potatoes cooked in coconut oil with salt and cheese has the best warming effect than any other food so far.

    #15063
    Sugarplum
    Participant

    Thanks for your reply Insider Fuzzy. Aw I’m really disappointed about the nut butter thing :(

    I should maybe have also added in my original post that I am recovering from a long term Anorexia Nervosa. So I’m kind of worried about maybe eliminating certain foods in case they become “bad/fear” foods – anyone with an ED knows that they are sly little buggers that can creep up and manipulate anything! May address this in another post.

    #15064
    Brittney
    Participant

    @Sugarplum, I recently finished those two books and I’m new to the forum as well :) I don’t think you should avoid your favorite nut butters, however it wouldn’t be smart to make them your primary food source day in and day out either. Right now, what’s more important than avoiding PUFAs is fixing the systemic problem. Fueling your body with enough energy and overcoming the controlling avoidance mentality is a bigger priority. If avoiding nut butters is going to perpetuate a fear of foods, I don’t think its worth it, because that fear puts the body under stress which Matt explains is what lowers the metabolism.

    I wish you the best on your road to recovery!

    #15065
    elfman5150
    Participant

    I agree with Brittney 100%. I read both DR 1 AND 2, and while in DR 1 he mentions to avoid PUFAs quite extensively, he seems to have backed off a bit in his DR 2 book. So I would rather focus on correcting the underlying problems and embracing all foods, including nut butters. I have a PB and J sandwich every day (with lots of peanut butter), and have only been feeling better and better once I started adding that into my diet. So if you crave it and enjoy nut butters, help yourself to them.
    Just my opinion, though. Maybe Matt will have something to add, as I’d be interested in hearing his current take on PUFAs as well.

    #15067
    shallowmeya
    Participant

    Hey @Sugarplum! I definitely agree with Brittney above. Right now the main priority is to give your body the love and encouragement it needs, in the form of unrestrictively eating whatever you want! If nut butters are really delicious and satisfying to you, there’s absolutely no reason to restrict yourself. The main thing is not to stress about it (I know, way easier said than done!)

    By the way, as long as you’re still getting dietary fat from saturated sources (ie coconut oil, butter & dairy, etc) I don’t think you need to worry about consuming PUFAs — which are literally impossible to avoid entirely. Yeah it might be rough on your body if your diet were 75% nut-based (for various reasons). But actually, I think it’s far more unhealthy to stress out about any food/ingredient/macronutrient than it is to actually ingest the damn thing. So, enjoy!

    And good for you for embarking on the recovery journey!! :)

    • This reply was modified 8 years, 4 months ago by shallowmeya.
    #15070
    Insider Fuzzy
    Participant

    @elfman5150 You should subscribe to 180D newsletter if you want the latest info from him. Matt released a long two part article on PUFA little over a week ago. It was a very anti-PUFA message. “PUFA is no doubt a primary cause of the widespread slowing of the metabolic rate of modern humans.” He also mentioned PUFA in non ruminant animals (chicken, turkey, duck, eggs, pork, and farmed fish) are full of the most ominous of all forms of PUFA, a fatty acid called Arachidonic Acid (AA).

    “Go ahead, type in “Arachidonic Acid” and the name of any disease or illness of your choice. You’ll unearth a big can of worms on Google with whatever you type in. While it’s another topic altogether, AA is the precursor to the formation of most of the human body’s inflammatory molecules. Inflammatory diseases are rapidly on the rise, and research keeps pointing more and more fingers at inflammation as the primary trigger of most illnesses.” This is all from the newsletter.

    #15071
    elfman5150
    Participant

    I think PUFA can be a problem if consumed in an extreme excess, but as for me I haven’t noticed any problems with it. I’m not consuming it each and every meal I have, but I’m not afraid of having some in my diet. Plenty of healthy people consume PUFAs to some degree. So yes, I’m not going to base my diet around them but I’m also not going to worry about having a few nuts or nut butters here and there. I do recommend macadamia nuts, however. They are full of monounsaturated fats, and they taste great!

    #15072
    Sugarplum
    Participant

    Thank you everyone!!!

    Yes, I will say my diet is NOT completely based on nut butters! A couple of tablespoonfuls a day max!

    And tbh – I don’t want to go into the details of how “bad” a certain food is, it’s inflammatory effects etc etc. This can just manifest into another ED quite easily. As far as I’m concerned NO food is bad if consumed in moderation…..with some foods being better than others for different peoples current health situation. And it has taken me many years to reach (and believe) this! :)

    #15073
    elfman5150
    Participant

    I think you’ve answered your original question then :)

    So enjoy your nut butters if you like them, and don’t worry about a thing. If it makes you happy (and PB&J definitely make me happy), then BE HAPPY!

    #15074
    Sugarplum
    Participant

    Haha! I loe you already elfman5150!!!

    Yeah I guess I have answered my own question – sorry – this whole thing is just very overwhelming right now! :P

    #15075
    Dutchie
    Participant

    Actually Macadamia nuts and Hazelnuts are higher in Mono-Unsaturated-Fat and less PUFA

    #15080
    TinaT
    Participant

    I just finished DR2, and I guess I need to go read it again, because the whole anti-PUFA argument totally bypassed me!

    I just recommended someone eat nut butters (oops?!)… and another “diet” book I read recently – which supports a lot of things in E4H and DR2 – suggests using nut butters as ‘healthy fats’ in smoothies (and it is really yummy, too!). But, in moderation: 1-2T a day I would think would not be a problem at all – especially, as someone mentioned above, if you balance that with other good fats in the other categories.

    What I took from DR2, was, if your body is asking for it… feed it!

    #15096
    elfman5150
    Participant

    Right on Tina! If you are getting ample nutrition from other fat sources there’s really nothing to worry about. Unless you personally notice some adverse affects from nuts/nut butters, I wouldn’t sweat it so much (unless your metabolism is really high, in which case you’ll sweat all the time!).

    #15100
    Sugarplum
    Participant

    Well I eat lots of coconut products, and also eat butter, cheese, mayonnaise and eggs. Oh and salmon and mackerel too.

    And I have no adverse effects with nut butters :)

    So I’m sure I’ll be ok!

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