Select Page

Simple question

Blog Forums Diseases and Conditions Simple question

Viewing 14 posts - 1 through 14 (of 14 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #9998
    Johnny Lawrence
    Moderator

    What do I tell someone who’s son has

    “a milk allergy/sensitivity, eczema, and asthma. :(“

    to do for him? She’s reading The Unhealthy Truth by Robyn O’Brien and is starting all her Aha! moments.

    P.S. I have no interest in getting in her pants, if that matters or not.

    #10027
    David
    Moderator

    Thanks for that PS. As I read your post, I kept asking myself, Is he trying to use dairy allergies to get into this mamacita’s pants, or what? It totally changes my advice! :)

    Actually, I’m not really sure what you’re asking. Do you mean, how can you help her find dairy substitutes for her son? Or, how can you talk her out of restricting her son’s diet? Something else?

    #10033
    Johnny Lawrence
    Moderator

    What is the best thing for him? I don’t know if she’s restricting his diet or not. With these problems, is that the most likely cause? Or is he genetically inferior like Matt?

    #10034
    David
    Moderator

    Well, dairy isn’t necessary for a healthy diet, but it would be unfortunate to eliminate it unless it’s a confirmed allergy. How does she know he’s allergic and not just, say, lactose intolerant? Was it a self diagnosis?

    I personally buy lactose free skim milk, which gives me no problems, although regular milk would.

    #10035
    karime22
    Participant

    After taking dairy (well, cow dairy) out of my son’s diet, his asthma symptoms almost disappeared. He also had random eczema like rashses that are now gone, thanks to removing a few other foods that he tested allergic to, including gluten.

    Removing gluten had a very positive impact on his behavior, too. He’s on the autism spectrum (barely), and removing food sensitivities/allergens has been what’s helped his physical and mental health the most.

    I know this site is very against food restriction, and I am too, but sometimes it *can* help. Thanks to Matt, we’re learning to be sure he gets plenty of carbs, calories and other good metabolism stuff so that he can hopefully overcome some of this food allergy crap. He already can eat some things he couldn’t eat a year ago, so I think it’s working.

    It’s possible the kiddo could overcome the eczema with eat for heat style eating though. I had some psoriasis type stuff on my elbows that has disappeared as I’ve been eating a lot.

    #10037
    David
    Moderator

    I would never object to something that works. It’s possible to make mistakes when diagnosing allergies, but if you’re certain you’ve correctly identified dairy, then I think it makes sense to keep with the dairy-free diet. Then you can test it every couple years (if his reactions aren’t too extreme) to see if he outgrows it, as many kids do. My own sensitivities diminish when I’m eating enough to keep my metabolism up.

    But like I said in my response to Johnny (sorry about the mamacita joke, by the way–I didn’t know you were a participant!), dairy’s not necessary for good health or anything. So you shouldn’t worry about that.

    #10040
    ThomasSeay
    Moderator

    Johny Lawrence,

    First of all, I think you should get into her pants. If you make her see God, she will most definitely be open to your suggestions. After that, you can tell her about the Health Fanatic Slipper Slope she should avoid and make some other more reasonable suggestions.

    #10041
    karime22
    Participant

    @David Nah, I was just giving my own story of my own kid to Johnny Lawrence just to suggest that maybe his friend could try removing the dairy from her kid’s diet if she hasn’t tried that. I’m not the girl he was talking about.

    • This reply was modified 9 years, 2 months ago by karime22.
    #10043
    David
    Moderator

    @Karime- Whoops, sorry again! That makes this thread way less awkward than I was imagining it.

    #10044
    karime22
    Participant

    Ha! Indeed : )

    #10056
    SBC037
    Participant

    Could your friend access raw milk? My kids have severe allergies (ie anaphylactic reactions) to nuts and shellfish. Children with food allergies often have food intolerances as well, but it was hard enough avoiding the nuts & shellfish so I didn’t want to restrict too much else. However, I noticed they couldn’t tolerate cow’s milk (bad eczema), so my first child was helped with homeopathy (I think I can hear the collective groan of disbelief, but it worked!). My other nut/shellfish allergy child did really well on raw cow’s milk. By 3 his eczema was completely gone and now at nearly 6, he can have dairy in any form. For us it was worthwhile not going the elimination route as he is picky enough about food as it is. Children with allergies can grow up fearing food and not being very adventurous which can lead to not eating enough which can lead to other problems, so I would suggest your friend be very cautious about that.

    #10077
    Ashley
    Participant

    Raw goat milk is even better if you can find someone who has healthy animals (should be slick and shiney, not scruffy), milks clean and chills the milk fast (so it tastes good). My dad has trouble with a lot of foods and he doesn’t handle raw cows milk as well as he does raw goats milk.

    #10078
    Matt Stone
    Keymaster

    Slipper slope? Is that like a ski area where everybody wears slippers?

    Food restriction is okay as long as facilitates core improvement of the condition (not just medicating the bad reaction) and adequate carbs, calories, salt, etc. are present in the diet. You just have to work a little extra to make it palatable and enjoyable.

    #10091
    ThomasSeay
    Moderator

    Whoops, typo. Meant “Slippery slope”. It’s a term I use to get into the pants of female health fanatics.

Viewing 14 posts - 1 through 14 (of 14 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.