Select Page

crinkly

Forum Replies Created

Viewing 13 posts - 61 through 73 (of 73 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • in reply to: I feel frustrated #11421
    crinkly
    Participant

    I’m no expert, patch, and can only speak from my experience but it seems that we are in the same position- I am stuck at around 36.3 waking, but it IS an improvement by over a degree! I feel as though the first bit, changes to body, weight gain, improved appearance and mood better skin, hair etc. was almost easy, the next phase is a challenge- just to make small changes, wait and observe, tweak again and again.

    For me, I suddenly got the urge to blast away at some physical exercise last week- I am following Matt’s suggestion of a thing called slow burn so I only need to do it once a week- that way I start getting an urge to do it- I have to do it because I really crave the massive exertion- whereas before exercise of that sort was a bore, even though I’ve always been very active (It’s not the same). Anyway the first day after doing this workout I leapt out of bed like a salmon ;)

    I would suggest making a small change, like, drop the vitamin, see how you go, try it again, see how you go, maybe try exercise if it suits you or you feel ready, but above all, stick with it and trust your gut.

    Best of luck

    in reply to: advice on most suitable 180 book #11325
    crinkly
    Participant

    Thanks Rob, I think I’ll check out eat for heat then. I must admit that I have developed a taste for milk recently which is unusual for me. I am having a hard time adjusting to the extra salt as I really didn’t have much of a salt habit before. I think my father- who pours salt on his bacon!!- put me off it.

    Best, crinkly

    in reply to: Living in the woods without enough food #11315
    crinkly
    Participant

    “domesticated people”- funny, I would put this in humour

    in reply to: Sunbeds #11312
    crinkly
    Participant

    Congratulations, Lynn, on your forthcoming wedding.

    If you live in Wales, UK, you can have a sunbed I found in the barn! Not sure whether it is safe tho, I would never use it as I spend a fair amount of time outside.

    I guess from the way you said fries that you don’t live in UK :)

    in reply to: Depo Shot #11311
    crinkly
    Participant

    I have heard that depo is the worst one from lots of my friends who have had it so I think you are making a wise decision.

    I really think the best contraception is to work out your own rhythm. It worked for me for two years then decided to have a child and got pregnant straight away. You will find that risky, however, because your cycle is probably altered from the hormones. You could try a hormone- free IUD until you balance out again. Beware, though many coils also contain hormones fro some mad reason, but you can get a non-hormone version. good luck

    in reply to: Has anyone tried "slow burn" #11162
    crinkly
    Participant

    Well as promised this is an update, I still have sore muscles in my legs and shoulders- which I suppose is the point, but today something unusual happened. When my baby started waking me up (by headbutting me and trying to mash my cheeks, nose and eyes as usual) instead of pretending to be asleep for as long as possible, I just woke up, and got up. This is not something I have been able to do since pre-teenage days. A coincidence?

    I don’t plan to do this workout until I stop feeling sore- the book says every 5 days or so is optimum.

    in reply to: Teeth health #11141
    crinkly
    Participant

    That’s an interesting toothpaste old mate, I might give that a try, does it have any “magical” properties?. I have largely given up toothpaste- when I brush my teeth I just use the brush but we have toothpaste in our house and I think it makes my mouth feel fresher.

    matt’s video makes me think of this article, about a “tribe” who:

    “have an almost pathological horror of and fascination with the mouth, the condition of which is believed to have a supernatural influence on all social relationships. Were it not for the rituals of the mouth, they believe that their teeth would fall out, their gums bleed, their jaws shrink, their friends desert them, and their lovers reject them. …the people seek out a holy-mouth-man once or twice a year. …The holy-mouth-man opens the client’s mouth and, using the above mentioned tools, enlarges any holes which decay may have created in the teeth. Magical materials are put into these holes. If there are no naturally occurring holes in the teeth, large sections of one or more teeth are gouged out so that the supernatural substance can be applied. In the client’s view, the purpose of these ministrations is to arrest decay and to draw friends. The extremely sacred and traditional character of the rite is evident in the fact that the natives return to the holy-mouth-men year after year, despite the fact that their teeth continue to decay.”

    full article here if any1 interested https://www.msu.edu/~jdowell/miner.html?pagewanted=al

    in reply to: LSD #11005
    crinkly
    Participant

    T Will, your story reminded me of this tune:

    not quite bluegrass though…..

    in reply to: Coconut water is nasty #11004
    crinkly
    Participant

    I quite like an unsweetened, plain coconut water drink. I first tried it when pregnant because I heard it was isotonic and could increase amniotic fluid- which did happen, and may have been due to the coconut water, (and watermelon I was eating for the same reason), but I will probably never know. I also drank it during labour and it seemed to give me an energy hit, it was definitely refreshing.

    in reply to: Are we now adapted to modern foods? #9846
    crinkly
    Participant

    I got quite a shock at an ethnographic museum in France when I compared the paleo- to the neo- lithic skeletons, the neo-lithic, especially the teeth were in a rotten state, but the paleolithic skeleton was amazing looking. I think that reliance on only a few cultivated crops by the time of the neolithic led to more endemic malnourishment, as well as coarsely ground cereals wrecking teeth- and teeth are the first part of digestion as I’m sure you know.

    But I don’t really have a view on whether we’re adapted to modern foods beyond saying culturally, yes, but not biologically so. But, like anything your own experience ought to guide you better than even the most reasoned opinion. From what I understand though, you can fill yourself adequately without satiety- at least this is what I experienced the other day after a meal of quinoa and vegetables, (my significant other likes to eat simply, but a hell of a lot! :))

    I will certainly try your method when it comes to criticism about food choices, although I trained myself out of a salty palate years ago, I have embraced it now.

    I also wonder whether we would gravitate towards the best foods for us if we were able to turn off the whingeing “voice of reason” which (in my view) is culturally conditioned by what we see around us.

    Best, crinkly

    in reply to: Are we now adapted to modern foods? #9751
    crinkly
    Participant

    I’ll take a shot at answering this question, bixy.

    Firstly, calling a carb-restricted diet “paleo” is totally misleading.

    During the lower paleolithic game was in abundance, but it is thought that people didn’t always hunt for muscle meat, they hunted for offal which they ate fresh and raw, offal is so much more nutritious and easily digested than muscle meat. Our modern cultural approach to meat is to mediate it with butchery, turning sinewy chewy fleisch into fine cuts is a modern skill. Then comes the cooking part…. Humans didn’t really use fire until much later in the paleolithic.

    Insects were a major food group for early humans (and strangely lacking in the modern paleo diet). Insects are easily digested, protein rich and full of useful oils and minerals. I recommend this book insects and human life by anthropologist Brian Morris who writes extensively about Malawi where insect gathering is a main subsistence activity for some people.

    Neither offal nor insects are as hard to digest as the food on the muscle-meat based paleo diet (think pate). Add to the original paleo diet honey, in as vast a quantity as you could find and fruits and tubers of all sorts, and of course salt (see below) and I think you’d be on a far healthier track than the modern paleo- diet- which seems “pale” (snigger) in comparison.

    Furthermore, I urge you to get into archaeology. Take a look at a paleolithic skeleton- they were absolute whoppers! Especially compared to neolithic skeletons, these guys were huge strapping people, but they would have walked miles getting their calories in, probably taking obscene risks in pursuit of honey then sat about gorging for as long as possible. We certainly have not, on the whole, developed bigger frames than these guys, quite the opposite in fact.

    I can’t remember where I read this but humans have got a “sweet tooth” it starts with breastmilk- or maybe in the womb, who knows? We gravitate towards sweet things, as sources of high-octane calories. Gathering honey even at great risk is a time-honoured practice. As for salt, it is well known that Japanese Macaques dip their potatoes into salt water to enhance the flavour, once tasted never beaten I suppose, I’m sure early humans with their huge brain capacity could add salt to food if available https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-euMlL9O1Kc. There are better links to this but this give you an idea.

    I’m personally bored with hearing about how our “genetic programming” means we should jump on the latest bandwagon, and find the paleolithic diet just silly- it’s based on a false premise about early humans which to me casts doubt on its integrity, why not simply call it low-carb meat-munching vegan diet?

    So Bixy, I hope I have helped to answer some of your questions, I also combined this with a mini-rant about paleo-ism (can you believe that I, a lactating mother, was told by a paleo-head, whilst starving at a funeral where the food had run out, that I was “eating the two worst things possible” (bread and cheese!)!!! I did get him to admit that it was “better than nothing”. The cheek of it!).

    Also, to Matt’s post, nobody at the moment is suggesting that genetics is the reason why people adapt to different environments, but there is a lot in evolutionary ecology which suggests that we are pre-programmed through phenotype to adapt to our environment. It’s called the enculturation model, however it assumes that we have some sort of an innate “culture uptake mechanism”, which would require triggering. The anthropological perspctive (e.g. Tim Ingold) would argue that this is not the case, that culture consists of practices and conventions which we learn in situ through enskilment. This sort of turns the evolutionary paradigm on its head – which Ashley might enjoy- but I won’t go into it here, suffice to say that, and bringing it back to food, that in my view our food preferences and avoidances are largely behaviour that is learnt through existing instructional structures, like our home lives, the media, social norms (consciously and unconsciously), and tempered with a large measure of “rule of thumb”, which probably goes some way to explaining why the Western, modern paleo diet doesn’t include insects, honey, salt and other good stuff.

    close rant.

    love, crinkly

    in reply to: Gaining weight and insomnia while nursing #7211
    crinkly
    Participant

    yes this sounds familiar, except my insomnia is induced by my son wanting to nurse. maybe you will drop weight when you wean your baby?

    in reply to: Welcome to the Women’s Health Forum #7187
    crinkly
    Participant

    Hi everyone, I stumbled upn this site from a post Matt made on a site called naturally knocked up.

    I was looking in to thyroid problems, as we have a history in our family of hypothyroidism, esp. in realtion to pregnancy and childbirth. I have had various symptoms fr a while, after a miscarriage then subsequent good pregnancy and baby, and dr have offered a blood test (which is my idea of absolute torture). After having a baby seven months ago, it is difficult to tell the difference between common thyroid symptoms and results of having a small baby, weight gain, fatigue, dry skin, hair etc.

    Anyway, after breastfeeding this long and not losing any weight I began taking morning temperature and found it was well cold! I tried the 30 day eating well and resting (as much as possible) approach and, my temp shot up, so that’s all good, and, honestly, just eating properly and eating enough can’t hurt anyone. My skin hasn’t been so terribly dry as before (no magic potions) and neither has my hair, no ice feet and hands etither. Also, I think my period is about to come back too (have had signs of ovulation).

    Thyroid is always something at the back of my mind, due to family history so I’m happy to take simple, non-invasive steps now and hopefully this won’t be an issue for me.

    One thing though: I love kale, it goes so well with a nice stew, red meat, scrambled egg, everything :). In fact I love all brassicas, we grow most of our own veg here in UK and due to climate we have to rely on brassicas for several months a year, (kale, turnips- yes I know they’re fodder-, swede, cabbages, kohl rabi, rocket, pak choi etc), my kale stands under 4 feet of snow and still tastes good. I’m hoping I can keep these as staple veg and still thrive.

Viewing 13 posts - 61 through 73 (of 73 total)