Select Page

David

Forum Replies Created

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 295 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • in reply to: Oatmeal, Salt, and Peeing #17240
    David
    Moderator

    I’m not sure if anyone is following these forums anymore, but I wanted to share my recent experiences with salt.

    In many ways, over the last year, I followed mainstream nutritional advice in terms of cutting calories and limiting fat intake, and this helped me lose about 50 pounds of unwanted weight. However, I never really bothered to look at my sodium intake. About a week ago, I decided to test a low-sodium diet (about 1500 mg) on myself to see how it made me feel. The result? I was practically bed-ridden with fatigue and malaise within two days. I felt totally stressed out and couldn’t get any work done. I made the best of it by rewatching two seasons of the Wire, but even Omar and Det. McNulty could do little to alleviate my misery.

    After 3-4 days, I closed up shop and went back to my usual high-sodium intake, which is I what I would naturally choose based on taste. I started feeling better almost immediately, but it took a couple of days to get back to feeling normal. The difference was so obvious that there is absolutely no question that (for me at least) salt is important for my sense of well-being.

    Sometimes our dietary preferences can deceive us, such as when they cause us to eat ourselves to a state of obesity, but it seems to me that the taste for salt is based on a real physiological need. So if salting oatmeal improves the taste, and it certainly does for me, then I would go ahead and salt it. In fact, I think that overeating may in some cases be caused by undersalting. If your body needs x grams of sodium to function normally, it makes sense that you’re going to keep eating until you get those x grams, regardless of calorie load.

    People who have dealt with certain kinds of chronic illness or stress may have a higher than average need for sodium. I think I’m one of them. Based on taste alone, I am a salt fanatic, and I plan to eat as much as I want without worrying about it. I even tried salting my coffee this morning, and the blended flavor of bitter, sweet, and salty was amazing, sort of like caramel. Not to mention, the caffeine rush was milder and more enjoyable than it sometimes is, which might be because the salt is muting the stress response. That’s conjectural, but if fits with the observation that salt blunts the output of the adrenal glands. Tonight I plan to try a salted beer, which I understand used to be a common practice.

    All that being said, I wouldn’t force yourself to eat salt if tastes unpleasant. Excess sodium intake could lead to bloating if you overload your kidneys. But as long as it tastes good, and you don’t notice any negative effects, I don’t think there’s any reason to limit yourself. The research on sodium is highly contradictory, and a low-sodium diet only seems indicated for sensitive individuals with specific health conditions.

    • This reply was modified 9 years, 8 months ago by David. Reason: typos
    in reply to: The "I Miss The Old Format" Thread #16548
    David
    Moderator

    And now I’m breaking my 30-minute internet rule! It is cool to see the surge of activity here, though.

    in reply to: How do you refeed with gut dysbiosis? #16547
    David
    Moderator

    Yeah, I’m aware my advice contrasts with the views presented in those books. But exercise and watching calories (not too low, but enough to gradually lose unwanted weight) has helped my digestive problems, while giving me more energy. I understand others will want to try different solutions.

    in reply to: The "I Miss The Old Format" Thread #16546
    David
    Moderator

    Thanks, Amy and Alatoras- It’s funny to me that I’m now a voice for moderation, since in the past my views on diet were often a bit extreme. Of course, the more extreme I was, the less healthy I got.

    I’m not sure how I became a moderator here, but it does seem that the three most regular moderators here lately (me, Thomas, and Amy) are also some of the biggest proponents of a moderate approach to diet. Maybe that explains how we got our titles.

    in reply to: Is Body Temperature Really the Be All and End All? #16544
    David
    Moderator

    Amy makes a good point. Most athletes are going to run into problems on a low-carb diet, even if those problems don’t show up immediately. And it sounds like you’re pretty low on carbs. If you explore the paleo blogs for a while, you’ll run into lots of people who switched to higher carbs after an initial low-carb honeymoon period. They just start to poop out after a while. But admittedly, some people seem to thrive on lower carbs, and it doesn’t make sense to fix something that isn’t broken. You just have to keep tuned in with your body to be sure you’re not denying your body what it needs.

    in reply to: Man With Fastest Metabolism Dies #16543
    David
    Moderator

    Thanks, man. By the way, I’m finding that your advice about ab exercises is correct (can’t remember the weightlifting website where I saw your post). I stuck with compound lifts, never did a single sit-up or any other ab isolation, and I’m now seeing my six pack start to appear. I’m loving it, because I’ve never had one before, even when I was lighter and did a bunch of sit-ups. Lifts like squats and deads seem to be enough, even though I still can’t deadlift as much as you are in your pic.

    in reply to: The "I Miss The Old Format" Thread #16535
    David
    Moderator

    I can see Corktree’s point that the forums have potential, but unfortunately there’s just not much activity here. I think new and old members have different expectations. New people come here looking for reinforcement of what they read in some of the books, and they may be disappointed when they encounter different viewpoints–or even complete disagreement. It seems in many people’s minds, 180 is now synonymous with overeating, avoiding water, sitting on the couch all day, and constantly checking your temperature. As Thomas pointed out, there is at least the appearance of a dogma now, where before there was more openness to exploration. This was perhaps inevitable, after so many changes over the years.

    I’ve stuck around because I thought my experience might be helpful to others, but honestly I just don’t have Amy’s knack for giving advice. I just try to pass on what worked for me, but my recommendation to exercise more and moderate calories probably isn’t what people are looking for when they come to this site. I might post a one-year progress update on myself here in a couple months (about how I ended a decade of bad health and traded in my beer belly for a six pack), but I think I’m pretty much done posting.

    The best thing about 180 has been how it’s helped people break their orthorexia. It’s important to realize that sugary cereal, pizza, and other “junk” food is just fine if you don’t go crazy with it. At least it was important for me. I hope people still get that message, though I’m concerned in some cases old obsessions are just traded in for new ones, which kinda defeats the point.

    in reply to: Is Body Temperature Really the Be All and End All? #16534
    David
    Moderator

    Many people screw up their health through too much experimentation, trying to achieve an ideal that doesn’t exist. If you feel great doing what you’re doing, are happy with your weight, and enjoy your food, I’d hesitate to change anything. In my opinion, the number on the thermometer is much less important than how you feel.

    in reply to: Man With Fastest Metabolism Dies #16533
    David
    Moderator

    Ha! Maybe he was just drinking too much water.

    in reply to: How do you refeed with gut dysbiosis? #16514
    David
    Moderator

    Don’t cut carbs, but increase activity so you lose any extra weight you’re carrying. Digestion should improve with improved overall fitness.

    in reply to: The "I Miss The Old Format" Thread #16513
    David
    Moderator

    Agreed. These forums seem dead. But this is probably better for our health anyway. I’m been trying to keep internet consumption down to about 30 minutes a day, so I have time for more productive things.

    in reply to: What's the real story about gluten? #16512
    David
    Moderator

    Bread is not toxic. Don’t feel guilty enjoying a regular life.

    in reply to: How to heal metabolism with elevated BG? #16413
    David
    Moderator

    A final note: Your BMI is in the normal range, so there’s no reason to cut calories. Of my two suggestions, increasing daily exercise is probably the most important. Eating more carbs and protein is helpful for increasing your exercise capacity, which is why I still think it’s important to moderate fat intake, though there’s no reason to go crazy with it. From my personal experience, I can run faster and work out harder when I keep fat intake down to like 50-70 grams a day–while keeping carbs and protein higher.

    For exercise, you might want to consider doing resistance training to build up some muscle. Do you have any experience with weight training? Do you currently exercise?

    in reply to: How to heal metabolism with elevated BG? #16411
    David
    Moderator

    Hi Dania,

    I agree that a low-carb diet is not going to solve your problem. Short term, it may improve your blood sugar, but long-term you’ll likely just feel like crap (as you experienced yourself) and become even more insulin resistant. It may work for some people, but for the majority of people low-carb dieting is a trap, leading to lethargy, weakness, and weird food aversions.

    I have two suggestions for you:

    1) Exercise daily, as much as you can. Exercise lowers blood sugar and improves insulin sensitivity. You can prove this to yourself. Eat a plate of pasta and check your BG. Then, the next day work out for an hour (walking is fine) and eat the same meal at the same time of day, immediately after the work-out. I guarantee your BG won’t go nearly as high. Exercise is your first weapon against becoming diabetic. If you can exercise an hour a day–not just for a couple weeks, but as a permanent lifestyle change–you will experience drastic improvements in your health that will continue for years to come.

    2) Cut out the ice cream and other fatty foods. Some fat in your diet is okay and even necessary, but too much dietary fat reduces insulin sensitivity. Fatty foods also make it easier to overeat, and excess calories are going to push your BG readings up. However, this doesn’t mean you need to give up your sweet tooth. For something sweet and creamy, try making a smoothie. For example: 1 banana, 1/2 cup low-fat milk, 1 scoop vanilla whey protein powder, and ice. This shake is delicious, and it’s a lot healthier than ice cream. You’re basically replacing the fat with protein, and I think it tastes just as good.

    This is the happy medium. You don’t have to give up pasta and eat that disgusting spaghetti squash, but eat your spaghetti with chicken breast and marinara instead of beef, cheese, or white sauce. Eat fruit smoothies instead of ice cream. Try a turkey sandwich and pretzels instead of the burger and fries. And most importantly, exercise as much as you can.

    That’s just my advice. Nothing too extreme is going to work long-term, but these two changes–exercising daily and moderating your fat intake–should be relatively easy to make, while bringing amazing results over time.

    in reply to: Cold Thermogenesis #16241
    David
    Moderator

    NP. It sounds like we agree.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 295 total)