Select Page

hazmatt

Forum Replies Created

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 28 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • in reply to: New to this. Something is leaving be confused…. #16227
    hazmatt
    Participant

    Low body temp = low thyroid

    Heat intolerance = bad

    Body heat = good

    Cold hands/feet = bad

    High temps signifies adequate heat production, and this means you’re generally warmer. Heat intolerance is different, and shows maybe a lack of physiological flexibility

    in reply to: High cortisol #15987
    hazmatt
    Participant

    Great post corktree

    in reply to: Peanut Butter #14287
    hazmatt
    Participant

    your son may not be having an allergic reaction to the peanuts themselves, but to mold growing on the peanuts. this reaction wouldn’t be as violent as an actual peanut allergy. those big storage bins in co-ops are pretty notorious for housing moldy peanuts. also, if you are grinding it fresh, then the fat in the peanuts wouldn’t be hydrogenated like what peat is talking about, but unsaturated, which is bad in peatland.

    in reply to: Why does overfeeding work? (an alternate theory) #13205
    hazmatt
    Participant

    i think that while neurochemical reactions certainly play a role in the positive effects of overfeeding, the aim of overfeeding is to induce a deeper “metabolic” change. not metabolism in the conventional sense of energy consumption, but metabolism in the sense of superior physical functioning. the improvement in your trigeminal nerve issue reminds me of matt’s improvement in tooth sensitivity. i haven’t paid too much attention to whether my teeth have become less sensitive, but i know for sure that when i’m using stimulants or caffeine chronically, my teeth are much more sensitive. i think we underestimate the global impact of elevated stress hormones on our physiology, and many of the improvements seen by those who overfeed are simply reversals of the damage done by being in a stress hormone dominant state, and not simply a neurochemical numbing effect.

    as for the improvements seen with your exercising, endorphins are released during exercise, and there’s also a lot of evidence that exercise makes your brain more resilient to stress. i think exercise is a vital part of any and every lifestyle, and the intensity should match your current level of health. however, i don’t think the same mechanism is at work behind overfeeding and exercise.

    in reply to: Temps good, hands and feet STILL cold! #12894
    hazmatt
    Participant

    From what I understand, cold hands and feet doesn’t have a lot to do with overall body temperature directly. Cold hands and feet are primarily a result of stress hormones, which tend to be lower on average when body temperature is higher. However, you can still have high stress hormone levels and high body temperature simultaneously. For instance, if I drink caffeine or have a hangover, or go for a long time without eating, my hands and feet tend to get cold, not because my body temperature is lower, but because all of those things tend to raise my stress hormone levels.

    in reply to: Meal Timing And Weight Loss #11232
    hazmatt
    Participant

    Calorie count in the group that lost most weight: 700 at breakfast, 500 at lunch, 200 at dinner.

    Calorie count in the group that lost less weight: 200 at breakfast, 500 at lunch, 700 at dinner.

    in reply to: Insomnia + burnt out adrenals… what is happening? #11016
    hazmatt
    Participant

    Sounds like you’re making progress. One thing to avoid in the beginning is making too drastic a change from what your norm has been. Although your previous “normal” may not have been good for you, it was still what your body was accustomed to. So, if your thirsty, drink. If you’re hungry, eat. Gradually incorporate more warming, calorie dense foods into your diet, and don’t push anything. Beyond forcing yourself to chug water all day, you aren’t doing much damage by drinking what you want. Just look to make gradual improvement. I think what many people forget, and what I forgot initially, is that forcing your body to do anything against its own innate wisdom is usually a bad idea.

    in reply to: Hungry soon after breakfast #11015
    hazmatt
    Participant

    Martin Berkhan wrote something about this on leangains a while back. I think post breakfast hunger may have something to do with some breakfast foods having a high glycemic index, coupled with high cortisol levels in the morning. Try adding some protein and/or fat to stabilize blood sugar levels.

    in reply to: Butter and Body Temperature? #11014
    hazmatt
    Participant

    You mention a reduction in bloating initially, so the weight you lost was probably just water. Weight fluctuations on such a short time scale usually aren’t fat.
    Butter is very calorie dense, and so goes a long way toward improving functioning for someone with a shitty metabolism. Its also seems to be one of the few foods a lot of people in the alternative health world agree on as being healthy.

    in reply to: Anabolism #9712
    hazmatt
    Participant

    That insulin article really filled in some blanks for me in the whole metabolism paradigm. Thanks for posting it.

    in reply to: Anabolism #9710
    hazmatt
    Participant

    Yea man, low fat sounds like a cool experiment to try, especially considering its the least in vogue of the diets right now probably. My initial thought when you said bodybuilders used to do low fat was that they were doing it for the same reason everyone else from that era did it; fat in food translated to bodyfat. But it sounds like you’ve got some science behind your approach.

    in reply to: Anabolism #9681
    hazmatt
    Participant

    The high carb, high protein, low fat thing seems sort of counterproductive in the sense that fats are supposedly the building blocks of anabolic hormones.

    I’m mostly gonna focus on creating the optimal anabolic environment at this point, using food, sleep, and heavy lifting. This is pretty much bulking anyway. I really want to see how good I can get my body comp using an anabolic environment alone, without restricting anything diet wise.

    in reply to: High Fructose Corn Syrup #8849
    hazmatt
    Participant

    had a terrible headache the other day (5th day without hfcs) and tried caffeine, but it didn’t help. drank about a cup of schweppes (with hfcs) and the headache went away, but then I’ve had a new acne breakout ever since. seems to be an unfortunately solid connection.

    also, has anyone seen the rat study involving hfcs and sucrose? half the rats were given access to a solution with the same amount of sucrose as soft drinks, while the other half was given access to a solution with half as much hfcs as soft drinks, and the hfcs group became significantly more obese and developed metabolic syndrome.

    http://www.princeton.edu/main/news/archive/S26/91/22K07/

    in reply to: High Fructose Corn Syrup #8307
    hazmatt
    Participant

    i also think its important to note that my acne from hfcs is made worse if I drink the soda on an empty stomach, providing no buffer between the hfcs and my stomach lining.

    edit: in the post above,

    “rather than the instantaneous spike which occurs with the already unbound sucrose and glucose in hfcs”

    i meant to say “unbound fructose and glucose in hfcs”

    • This reply was modified 10 years, 10 months ago by hazmatt.
    in reply to: High Fructose Corn Syrup #8306
    hazmatt
    Participant

    yo peeps, thanks for the responses, especially to scott for doing some serious research. i’ll try to respond to some of the stuff you said scott, without going overboard.

    sucrose and hfcs are pretty much identical in their composition, so i have no beef with the %5 extra fructose. the composition of hfcs isn’t what i find relevant to my acne. the only difference worth mentioning between hfcs and sucrose is the absence of a chemical bond. sucrose has a carbon atom bonding its glucose to its fructose, while hfcs has no such bond.

    thus, the fructose and glucose from hfcs can enter directly through the stomach lining without needing to be absorbed through the intestine, while the fructose and glucose in sucrose must first be separated by the sucrase enzyme in the intestine. while its true that stomach acid can dissolve the chemical bond in sucrose, this isn’t a very efficient process and most of the sucrose still needs to be broken down in the intestine by the sucrase enzyme. if it were an efficient process, the sucrase enzyme wouldn’t need to exist.

    the main importance of this fact, that sucrose digests more slowly, is that it allows for a slower, more controlled release of fructose and glucose into the bloodstream, rather than the instantaneous spike which occurs with the already unbound sucrose and glucose in hfcs. over time, with the consumption of multiple sodas a day, these continuous rapid spikes become problematic. now, i’ll admit this is all speculation and based on stuff I’ve read, but its the best reasoning i’ve come up with to explain the correlation between my acne and hfcs consumption. other potential reasons include:

    1. hfcs is highly processed and contains some contaminant
    2. i’m allergic to hfcs or maybe processed corn
    3. my lack of acne has nothing to do with hfcs, and i’m an idiot

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 28 total)