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MikeJ

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  • MikeJ
    Participant

    Dutchie,
    Sorry to hear about this. Hope you’re feeling better now. I have low iron, too, and am curious what is the reason for cutting out starches because of this?

    in reply to: 180 Degree Failures #9888
    MikeJ
    Participant

    Correction to my milk diet comment above: I drank three *half-gallons* a day (so six quarts), not three quarts! Three quarts was breakfast!

    in reply to: 180 Degree Failures #9887
    MikeJ
    Participant

    Jdubs, you make some good points. Gut dysbiosis is a given after years of antibiotics and refined foods growing up. Probiotics-wise, I have been taking Primal Defense Ultra for the last year, which is a major help. I notice a difference going just one week without it.

    Malnutrition is also a given. The hair analysis and my basic symptoms show that clearly. Also, I am well aware that the usefulness of hair analysis depends on the skill and knowledge of the interpreter, that many people doing hair analysis probably have no idea how to translate this information into effective dietary and therapeutic recommendations, and that it is a newer field in which there is still much that is unknown. It is definitely far from as simple as: “the level of iron in your hair corresponds to the level of iron in your blood or in your tissues.” You could have high or low iron in your hair for any number of reasons, ranging from high intake with poor absorption, to normal intake but with too many iron antagonists, to adequate iron stores but inadequate copper, etc., and the same level on two tests could indicate two entirely different things. The necessary corrective measures will differ depending on the cause, and the establishment of the cause will depend on proper understanding of the whole picture of what’s going on in the body, not on some myopic look at just one factor. There’s great complexity and nuance to it, and where there’s complexity and nuance, there’s usually at least some usable truth.

    As for acid reflux, I never have that; I am on some other plane of metabolic dysfunction entirely.

    Serotonin is either the Second Coming or the anti-christ, depending on who you ask. Ray Peat’s theories on it make more sense to me, and seem to fit better with my experience. For example, bananas, which supposedly can greatly increase serotonin, seriously constipate me.

    I did the ultimate liquid diet three years ago: three quarts of raw milk and kefir every day for thirty-two days. My weight rose from 160 to 175 pounds, but it did not correct my constipation or my low libido, and I later lost the weight.

    Finally, I actually do not feel desperate at all, and probably feel as optimistic and fulfilled as I ever have on a regular basis. So many things are going well for me that simply do not belong on a nutrition forum, so what you see instead is a one-sided portrait of an ostensibly “doomed” creature. But it’s actually not that way at all–at least from my perspective!

    Plus, I have made some truly significant improvements with hair analysis and my own supplemental adjuncts (probiotics, magnesium oil, and more recently gelatin) over the past half-year, and if you read my original post carefully, you will see I was not even asking for help so much as posing an intellectual challenge to this community: if achieving health is only a matter of raising the metabolism, and raising the metabolism (besides obvious lifestyle factors) is as easy as just eating a bunch of food without restriction, how do you explain people like me for whom this approach plainly fails? That was my real question, and I would love to see Matt or anyone else try to grapple with it on a serious and thorough level.

    in reply to: 180 Degree Failures #9881
    MikeJ
    Participant

    Amy, I defer to your expertise on homeopathy. But if I am correct that it doesn’t operate by way of providing minerals and nutrients to the body in relative abundance, I am still fuzzy on how it accomplishes much for a depleted body. I guess in my conception, all “underlying imbalances,” whether hormonal, nutritive, etc. have as their root cause imbalances in mineral levels. So if homeopathy is not working at this level, in my mind, it’s not working at the root. But perhaps it exerts an effect on some other biochemical level that in turn modifies the body’s utilization and retention of certain minerals, thereby bringing balance?

    Also, thanks for the triphala suggestion. I have heard of it but have not tried it. I am weary of anything labeled as a “laxative,” as that term connotes to me forcing out of the body what the body has chosen to hold onto, presumably for some better reason. I think a distinction needs to be made between relieving constipation by supplying what the body truly needs to overcome it and relieving constipation by a kind of “remedial” (as in remedy) force, from which the body will actually become more depleted over time. Not saying which category triphala falls into, as I have yet to look into it seriously.

    in reply to: 180 Degree Failures #9879
    MikeJ
    Participant

    VizzyC, thanks for the recommendation.

    Patch, thanks for the suggestion. I don’t like blood tests for two main reasons: 1) taking blood from the body depletes it of nutrients and energy, which mine is already deficient in; and 2) in the past, I have always been told my levels were “normal,” whether doing a full thyroid panel, sex hormone panel, blood sugar panel, etc.–when I clearly had serious problems in all those areas! But I have certainly tried these and a variety of other diagnostic approaches as well as a variety of therapeutic approaches over the last 4-5 years. I will continue experimenting with approaches that seem rational until I find what fixes me.

    Dutchie, over the past two years, I have worked very conscientiously at maintaining a positive attitude no matter what’s going on with my body. As such and for other reasons perhaps, I do not really experience significant mood swings that follow my digestive rhythms. However, when I have a good, overdue shit, I am generally elated right after. Not sure how much of the apparent feel-good chemicals are released because of the significance I mentally attach to the event vs. because of the physical relief from the event itself.

    in reply to: MinCol #9295
    MikeJ
    Participant

    I’ve had high aluminum levels on hair tests since coming off MinCol and MinCol is high in aluminum. However, it is possible the aluminum is from another source (like sea salt, or produce from deficient soil) or that it is being sequestered in the hair and not causing harm–though it seems like even just transporting it safely out of the body would waste energy and minerals. It’s complex, but I don’t trust the stuff any more. It’s hard to say whether it helped me or not in the long run, but I never felt any obvious harm from taking it for the year-plus that I did.

    in reply to: 180 Degree Failures #9281
    MikeJ
    Participant

    @MrRoberts
    You wrote:

    Try using very dark brown sugar on Oatmeal, toast with butter and a cup of low-fat yorgurt with Maple juice.
    That’ll make you go no problem.

    Correction: That’ll make *you* go no problem. You have no idea what will work for me. These are not unknown foods to me, or unknown food combinations. As I said, sugar constipates me. I have mixed results with grains, fats, and dairy. None are a panacea, whether taken together or separately. If it were that simple, this problem would have been solved twenty-five years ago and I wouldn’t be on this forum! :)

    • This reply was modified 9 years, 2 months ago by MikeJ.
    in reply to: 180 Degree Failures #9279
    MikeJ
    Participant

    Amy, I’m open to everything, but I have had negative experiences with most of it. Most practitioners within a particular “system” seem to have a very narrow understanding of anything that would actually be relevant.

    For example, I went to an acupuncturist a few years ago. I told him my diet (high-saturated fat, high-cholesterol, high-carb, high-protein, high-salt) and what I wanted help with (gaining weight and raising my blood pressure) and I could see his brain quietly imploding behind his eyes. The average expert’s (alternative and mainstream alike) theory of health is pathetically shallow when it comes to reckoning with my physiology.

    Call me biased, but if I am deficient in every essential mineral (as suggested by a hair test several months ago), sticking needles in my legs or taking a few drops of tiger tonic or something is not going to restore to me what is missing. I don’t think those therapies remotely approach the root cause of dysfunction; they’re just providing surface treatment of symptoms while the root cause goes unconsidered just like in the worst of Western medicine.

    in reply to: 180 Degree Failures #9276
    MikeJ
    Participant

    Thanks, Betty. Every case is so different. I’ve been eating a lot of white rice, but it seems like I get better movements with whole grains sometimes. While at other times, whole grains seem not to help at all. I’ve supplemented vitamin C to no avail, definitely agree on limiting fruits, but have the opposite experience with vegetables. If I don’t eat well cooked vegetables, I don’t go. Nightshades are definitely constipating for me, though, so I avoid those.

    Drinking less water is probably the number one practice guaranteed to keep me constipated. I never drank water daily until I was 27. It definitely helps me, but it’s tricky to find the balance between staying hydrated with the right amount and crashing blood sugar with too much (this is another target that moves daily). Sugar constipates me, too. It’s what I grew up on. Never helped me then; and aggravates things now, though I will continue to experiment with honey while cutting out all fruit.

    in reply to: 180 Degree Failures #9258
    MikeJ
    Participant

    Mr. Roberts, that sounds like a great diet for a healthy person who maybe experiences constipation once in a blue moon. I ate that way for two years. The problem is, I am not a healthy person. Eating that way did not help my constipation much at all. What sustains the average person with no serious digestive problems is not the same as what will heal someone who has never had a week of regular bowel movements in their life.

    in reply to: 180 Degree Failures #9254
    MikeJ
    Participant

    Dutchie, I sympathize. I’m getting edema now too in spite of generous use of salt.

    Thanks, Vizzy.

    Jussi, I have been constipated my entire life. That is not an exaggeration. So, of course I have tried fruit! :) I stuffed myself full of it last summer in the context of a non-vegetarian, high-calorie diet and was freezing cold all the time, developed an even lower libido (as in zero whatsoever), and had absolutely horrible yeast patches break out all over my trunk. I pooed reasonably often but they were not well formed at all. Bananas (ripe or unripe, doesn’t matter) are complete poison to me. They are one of the most constipating foods I know of. Seriously, anyone who thinks they help are from another planet as far as my experience goes. Plus, they make me feel awful mentally and energetically, too, which few single foods ever do.

    in reply to: 180 Degree Failures #9253
    MikeJ
    Participant

    Thanks, Matt.

    Amy, I have not been tested for celiac. However, I rarely eat gluten grains and have often gone many months at a time without any at all.

    Linda, I have tried lots of coconut oil in the past. I may try adding it again, since other variables within my diet have changed since that time. However, I have generally never found fats to aid with constipation like so many people think they do. Usually the contrary. One thing I am pretty convinced of at this point is there is no single magic bullet food whose addition or removal will magically resolve a problem like this. If there were, I would have found it already, because I have tried them all. I think what has to be focused on above all else is the whole system: the combined effect of all the elements of one’s diet and lifestyle and their interactions in the specific context of a body with a particular biochemical makeup. This is much harder than finding one’s alleged “superfood,” because there are infinitely more variables to consider and you are always chasing after a moving target.

Viewing 12 posts - 1 through 12 (of 12 total)