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Moonflower

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  • in reply to: Dr. Hyman's Addicted to Carbs video #8821
    Moonflower
    Participant

    Who cares?

    I recommended one of Hyman’s books on metabolism on another forum topic as a way to understand the reason you shouldn’t undereat, but I forgot how anti-sugar he is. I will never be anti-sugar after reading Ray Peat’s, or rather, Danny Roddy’s translation of Ray Peat’s research on sugar.

    But yeah, I’m addicted to things that give me energy. ;)

    in reply to: Let's Talk Shit About Ray Peat #8683
    Moonflower
    Participant

    I agree with J-lo that Peat’s insights and research into sugar, salt, gelatin and PUFAs have been very helpful, and his research on sugar has been HUGE.

    Who else has done convincing research on the health benefits of sugar? Without that insight, I would still think that sugar was evil and useless, mistakenly thinking it was the cause of all kinds of illness and I would be missing out on knowing about the importance of sugar for energy. With that insight, I can feed my body with the kinds of sugar it needs for energy production, and overcome the tremendous lack of energy that has plagued me since falling for the low carb dogma several years ago. And where would Matt be without that insight?

    Peat was telling the truth about PUFAs even before the WAPF was. Although, I have to admit that I think he’s gone too far with paranoia about finding it in vegetables. And the starch and serotonin paranoia has gone too far. But those things are almost incidental compared to the main thrust of his research on supporting thyroid function.

    Speaking of WAPF, I think their research and publication on the truth about fats was HUGE. Where else would most of the have found out about that?

    in reply to: Weight loss for women over 50 #7917
    Moonflower
    Participant

    Show her this:

    http://www.health-calc.com/diet/energy-expenditure-advanced

    It shows graphically that you need to eat enough calories to support your resting metabolic rate, but below your total energy expenditure.

    Maybe a book would help explain why it’s necessary to eat above your resting metabolic rate. I remember Mark Hyman had a convincing way of explaining it, even if his nutritional advice was not the best, at least it was conventional, which may fit into her way of thinking.

    There are other books about metabolic diets, too, but I haven’t read them.

    in reply to: Welcome to the Healthy Weight Loss Forum #7801
    Moonflower
    Participant

    Check this out! (Also got this reference from Rob.)

    http://gokaleo.com/taking-up-space/

    “While most recommend eating as little food as possible and doing as much exercise as one can bear, Taking Up Space advocates finding the MAXIMUM amount of calories and minimum number of paranoid restrictions that still gets results.

    In the book, Go Kaleo talks about her incredible 80-pounds of slow, effortless, hunger and craving-free weight loss that never came back ? all on a steady diet of 2800 calories a day with a few good workouts a week. No big cravings for carbs, meat, fat, or sweets ? as these were things that she was eating in ample abundance every day.

    After reaching a healthy goal, what did she do? She increased calories even more only to find that this allowed her to build toned muscle and shed more fat than ever before.”

    So it is eating less and exercising more, initially, but with a different emphasis. Instead of trying to eat as little as possible, you eat as much as you can without gaining. That’s a completely different approach and mindset from thinking you’re doing better by eating less. So now I have to learn how to count calories after all, not in order to starve myself, but to know how to go to the edge of what I can eat without going over the edge. I’ve always known that’s how it works, but didn’t know how to determine where the edge was.

    in reply to: Welcome to the Healthy Weight Loss Forum #7798
    Moonflower
    Participant

    Rob just posted a good calculator on another forum topic. It shows you how many calories you need to stay above your basal metabolic rate and below your total energy expenditure.

    http://www.health-calc.com/diet/energy-expenditure-advanced

    in reply to: Welcome to the Healthy Weight Loss Forum #7794
    Moonflower
    Participant

    And still eating way too late. My schedule is still terrible.

    in reply to: Welcome to the Healthy Weight Loss Forum #7792
    Moonflower
    Participant

    If I knew the answer to those questions, Cathy, I wouldn’t still need to lose weight myself. I keep stalling because of one thing or another, either eating too much or not exercising enough, I guess.

    Congratulations on getting your temp up and stabilizing your weight. Looks like you’re primed for weight loss, if only we could crack the code.

    in reply to: Welcome to the Healthy Weight Loss Forum #7452
    Moonflower
    Participant

    Salsrice, my eating schedule is still not exactly right. I did stop gorging on too much fatty meat and pasta in the evening, but I’m still eating way too late at night, sometimes as late as midnight for dinner. That’s way too much of a strain on my liver, but I do that because I’m not getting off the computer soon enough. I really have to change that and eat dinner early in the evening for the sake of my liver. I will probably still have ice cream before bed, though, to keep blood sugar stable.

    I definitely think that eating more food earlier and less food later helps prevent weight gain. I don’t think I could have added as much food as I added for breakfast later in the day without gaining weight. I added a lot of fruit, juice, syrup, pancakes, ice cream and all kinds of carbs to my breakfast and did not gain.

    But there is a limit. When I ate lots of biscuits several days in a row I would gain. I think it’s the wheat. Plus biscuits need lots of butter and syrup. May have to try other kinds of flour to experiment, but not till I lose a few pounds. Too many variables to keep track of.

    in reply to: Welcome to the Healthy Weight Loss Forum #7417
    Moonflower
    Participant

    When I was in refeeding mode last winter, I gained some weight over the holidays, and I was overjoyed to be eating carbs again, so I really indulged myself. At one point, I realized a lot of those processed foods had large amounts of vegetable oils in them, so I quit eating those.

    Several times that winter I made chuck roast, pot roast style with lots of liquid, then cooked lots of angel hair pasta in the broth. So yeah, I was gaining on the combination of more than usual amounts of protein, fat and carbs.

    I was trying to get more gelatin in my diet, but it was way too palatable. Came to my senses and just bought Great Lakes powdered gelatin. Also decided to cut back on eating so much in the evening and started eating more in the morning.

    I made lots of pancakes, biscuits, brioche toast, and bought croissants and cinnamon rolls made with butter, etc for breakfast and ate them with one or two eggs and coffee with half and half. Sometimes have veg frittata. Did not gain but did not lose, either. I’m only walking, but I’ve rinsed off my exercise mat and will resume moderate work outs.

    Started drinking oj and eating more fruit and dairy (ricotta, cottage cheese, sour cream, cheese) and less flour products. Still eating one or two eggs. I have gotten addicted to coffee ice cream. May have to break it off eventually, but I’ve started losing a pound or so a day when I walk and exercise and I don’t drink any alcohol. I’m eating about 3-4 oz meat and at least an equal amount of carb for lunch. Eating salad and cooked veg with butter in the evening, with cheese and rye crackers. I usually have some ice cream with milk afterwards. I need to lose about 15 pounds at least to look decent because I’m short. I’m 62.

    I’ve noticed that I tend to gain when eating too much food made with wheat especially or when I overdo it with too many starchy foods in one day. Angel hair pasta used to make me gain until I got the pasta made with jerusalem artichokes. Probably still need to watch portion size. With my current routine, I usually eat the same amount of protein every day, so now it tends to be carbs, and the fat that goes with them, that make me gain. That just makes sense when the amount of protein you eat remains the same. So keeping the amount of protein stable is a good anchor for me. I suppose I could cut down more on fat (ice cream, butter, cheese), but those things are hard to give up. Cutting down on alcohol for sure.

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