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SBC037

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Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 35 total)
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  • in reply to: Recovering from eating disorders and kids #9563
    SBC037
    Participant

    @christy
    My 5 year old son is similar. My older kids will eat a range of food. The eldest won’t touch food when she’s not hungry or eat beyond satiety and I think has a pretty healthy attitude to food. I see myself in my middle son – he loves all kinds of food, he says he’s hungry right after big meals and eats and eats and eats. He admits sometimes he’s not hungry – just wants ” something yummy”. He’s probably my most robust, healthy, energetic child and he isn’t overweight.
    Unlike your 6 year old, my 5 year old wont touch fruit in any form whatsoever. He doesn’t like cake or dairy desserts except icecream. He hates meat, picks the cheese off pizza & just eats the base. If we are eating fruit or yogurt near him, he makes us move away and can’t look at it. He eats loads of raw vegetables (even cauliflower) and cooked vegetables including soups. It was soon after I stopped breast feeding him (when he was 3) that I started GAPS/WAPF and wonder if that has affected him, though I always let the kids have a much more watered down version of the diet. He is pretty small for his age, pasty, has bad teeth and just not as robust as I’d like him to be but all the usual calorie dense enticements don’t seem to appeal to him and I don’t want to make him eat but he seems to live on air. He doesn’t get sick a lot and he has energy but he doesn’t look well! He has a lot of serious (as in anaphylactic reactions) allergies to foods, so I wonder if that makes food scarey for him. I think I need to honour his choices in food even though they may be very different to what I like, if he’s left to choose, maybe he’s making the right choices for his body even if his diet looks nothing like it’s “supposed” to. He also has tantrums and I think it’s due possibly to low blood sugar from not recognising he has to stop what he’s doing and eat!while I want to teach him self care I don’t want to over-ride his own mechanisms but its hard not to when it looks like they’re not working too well for him!

    in reply to: Lymphatic Massage or Life Coaching? #9288
    SBC037
    Participant

    You could have fun designing those. Maybe you could offer them as giveaways on your blog.

    in reply to: husband hates my weight gain #9228
    SBC037
    Participant

    @VizzyC
    Or to summarise, just to make it even easier for the blokes to understand, Happy Wife = Happy Life.

    in reply to: Are we now adapted to modern foods? #9215
    SBC037
    Participant

    http://www.ted.com/talks/heribert_watzke_the_brain_in_your_gut.html
    I think this is related to this topic and interesting in and of itself.

    in reply to: Official Music #9214
    SBC037
    Participant

    This is probably a bit pedestrian compared to the others, but it might be one for the kids.

    in reply to: Lymphatic Massage or Life Coaching? #9213
    SBC037
    Participant

    Will shit banks eventually replace blood banks? Or if you have high quality shit, could you command a higher price for it?

    in reply to: paleo diet deficiencies in children #9118
    SBC037
    Participant

    Hi AnaMargarida
    I started a topic (I think under “Eating Disorders”) about kids and food. Matt and some others replied with some advice about feeding kids – might be worth a look there. I’m not sure, but I suspect if kids are eating a good balance of palatable foods covering the major macro-nutrients, the micro-nutrients will take care of themselves. I’ll defer to Matt & others more knowledgeable than I on that though.
    Your English is beautiful. I’d love to be able to write Portuguese that well!

    in reply to: thinking about quitting #9013
    SBC037
    Participant

    I agree with Jdubs. There’s so much work and pressure when you have young children. I was in quite a state at times that whenever anyone suggested anything that might help I felt it as another pressure! Meditate! Walk! Take time out! Do yoga! Eat this! Eat that! Wean the baby! Go on a girls’ night out! Have a date night with your husband! All well-meaning. I just didn’t want any of that. I just wanted some bloody sleep! It’s so hard to create the path to more sleep when you have little children so sometimes just being super kind to yourself, deeply resting even if you’re not sleeping and knowing that this intense phase of your life will pass is enough. In the meantime, try to be as good to yourself as you are to your babies.

    in reply to: Low Blood Pressure/Hypotension #8999
    SBC037
    Participant

    Hi Mali
    I have v low BP too (like you, in the range of 90/50). Doctors usually give me a medal for it rather than see it as a problem, but I suspect it affects my energy levels, anxiety, etc. I once asked my doctor what I could do to raise it & she jokingly said “Have lots of red meat, salt and alcohol”. I suspect there is a pretty strong genetic element with BP. Both my parents have very low BP. Maybe that’s the case for you? I notice it more in hot weather (& so have a preference for cold weather). I saw a very interesting BBC documentary about introversion/extroversion, response to pain & BP. Seems introverts respond to pain with lowered blood pressure and extroverts respond with raised blood pressure. I suspect that means absolutely nothing to us and isn’t at all helpful, but I thought I mention it anyway :-)

    SBC037
    Participant

    Thanks Matt.
    My name’s Jude. When I made my login, I thought SBC037 would be my password, not my moniker. People might think it stands for Some Bitch Complaining, which is probably pretty accurate, but not what I meant! Bit of an old fart when it comes to technology.
    I’ll give your suggestion a go.
    I read Geneen Roth’s books (Breaking Free from Compulsive Eating and When Food Is Love) a long while ago and those helped to get me out of the worst of my compulsive over-eating (i.e. eating to the point of feeling sick all day every day in a punishing, not enjoyable way) and I learned to enjoy and appreciate all kinds of food. Before that I couldn’t ever eat in company or even say the word “food” or “eat” or “hungry” in conversation I made good progress towards having a healthy relationship with food, but then I started down the path of eating to try to fix physical and mental health problems (stomach ulcer, over-active thyroid, exotic intestinal parasites, anxiety). Since realising I just couldn’t go on with those punishingly restrictive diets (and questioning their efficacy and long-term safety) I found your work and jumped straight from GAPS to RBTI and though I’ve seen some good improvements in sleep, digestion and sugar stability (and thus, a little less anxiety) even the small restrictions of RBTI – no chocolate, white rice, not eating certain things after 2pm make me feel cagey and wanting to break the rules! On the other hand, I fear the effects that unrestricted eating might have on my sleep and anxiety. I guess I’m not sure if I should stick with RBTI or a modified version of it or if wanting to give it the flick and Eat the Food is just the compulsive eating tendencies talking.
    Anyway, at the risk of sounding like a complete sycophant – love your work, you’re the best, you rock and you’re so handsome (Will that get me that a free consultation?)

    in reply to: Body Image and Self Esteem #8863
    SBC037
    Participant

    It’s hard to find balance. There seem to be a lot of people with an over-inflated sense of their ability with loads of confidence (I’m thinking of some of those Idol/Talent show contestants!) and others with extraordinary ability who either don’t recognise it or talk themselves down. A nice, realistic assessment of one’s abilities/worth with enough confidence to walk through life with ease and get the job done can seem rare and elusive at times.

    SBC037
    Participant

    Aaah, I find this so difficult, too. My idea of good food and bad food is so ingrained that if I REALLY want to eat “good food” & fill up on it, my script goes like this: “Ah, that’s great. You ate all that good food. Now it’s time for something nice.” “But I REALLY wanted to eat that and now I’m satisfied”. “Yeah, right! You don’t want chocolate! You don’t want custard and apple pie. Come on! You may as well eat it now, otherwise you’ll just crave it later, then you’ll eat too much and you won’t sleep, you’ll get anxious. You’re just trying to be good with all that fancy talk about vegetables & stuff being satisfying. Try hard, do-gooder. Be honest. If you really want to kick this disordered eating thing, you’ve got to eat the bad stuff too.” The problem, apart from all that crazy self talk is that there is such a variety of food that I don’t think I could ever exhaust it’s appeal to me. Sure, I get too full sometimes and stop, but I get right back on the horse with something else the next day. This variety of chocolate, that flavour of chips, that interesting-looking pastry. I get the concept of neutralising food and I don’t necessarily feel guilty, but I can’t seem to get over this perverse compunction to eat “bad food” even when I actually don’t want it. I realise there must be a fundamental bit of the psychological puzzle I’m missing in all this, but I don’t seem able to access it at the moment.

    in reply to: Body Image and Self Esteem #8808
    SBC037
    Participant

    My brother suffered from this. He was extremely shy when little and not good at schoolwork and in his teens decided the way to get through school when your’e not great at academics was to be popular. He was funny and good at sports then took up body building. I think not being tall added to his desire to be big in another way. He dieted very strictly, worked out, and became quite aggressive at times even though he was an incredibly gentle soul. He got very big, won some competitions, then he travelled overseas with his girlfriend. Somewhere along the way, they broke up. He was devastated by that. He stopped working out and got “small” again and I think his loss of body image contributed to some kind of identity crisis. It’s complicated and other things must have come into it, but I think it’s a big part of why he didn’t make it home.

    in reply to: Recovering from eating disorders and kids #8804
    SBC037
    Participant

    Thanks for your replies. My Mum was of that generation where you would always feed visitors something if they dropped in for tea, even if unexpectedly, and the food always had to be homemade. So, she would make the most outrageously sweet, delicious creations for visitors. We were not allowed to touch them. There were 7 kids, so if we each had a couple, there’d be none left. We could have shredded wheat biscuits or fruit if we were hungry between meals. I always raided the visitor tin & felt terrible. Mum started taping it up. I’d untape it, take some, tape it back up, hope she wouldn’t notice, feel terrible, and when I was older, promise to bake some more! We didn’t have much money so I don’t think she was restricting us for dietary reasons, just practical ones but as I continued to raid the tin, I got the “You’ll get fat/You are too fat” admonishmenta. With 7 kids & a limited budget (no cheap fast foods in our house) you just bloody well ate as much as you could when the food was around because if you didn’t someone else would. We didn’t have the luxury of eating it later if we didn’t feel like it now because it wouldn’t be there, so appetite had nothing to do with food in a way. Chocolate is the hardest thing for me to be neutral about. If a block of chocolate is open, I am hell bent on eating it all before the day is through so I can “start over” being good and not eating any the next day. Repeat scenario ad infinitum.
    My kids’ lives are very different. I understand something now that I didn’t eaover the last few years which Matt points out, that kids just need to eat enough. It sounds obvious, but if our kids’ likes & dislikes are different to ours or we’re on some kind of healtby eating plan & the house is stocked with food we like or are “allowed” on any given program, they can go hungry. I think I have been careful enough to not override my kids appetites so none of them have been forced to eat or told they’ve had enough. It’s just this constant, niggling voice in my head, imagining judgements from others if I have icecream & biscuits and pizza and all that “bad food” in the house. The fear also is that they, like me, will not be able to control themselves and eat sweets all day. I think, though, that my littlest one particularly has suffered from my not having palatable foods in the house. While the others would just go ok & make the best of what was on offer (in the vegetarian, then GAPS days), he would just go without. He had bad teeth when he was only 2 which I was so ashamed about because I was so careful about what we ate (ie no junk food, all homemade, no sugar etc) except for a chocolate treat after his bath. Maybe it wasn’t the little bit of chocolate but not enough icecream! As in, maybe he just wasn’t getting enough calories to make him robust and healthy. Despite all this, they are in pretty good shape in terms of their body size and image and attitude to food. The challenge for me is to not go off on some health-seeking mission that involves limiting the types of food I offer them because there is a lot of noise out in the world about that and in my past and it’s hard to block it out.
    Thanks again.

    in reply to: Getting Started #8317
    SBC037
    Participant

    Matt
    Your ability to be friendly and warm, seriously helpful and funny all at the same time is wonderful. No wonder you’ve got so many of us listening.

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 35 total)